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In a subroutine, %0 expands to the subroutine name, not the script name. Is there a ligitimate way to still access the script name, or should I pass it as an argument?

@echo off

call :subroutine %~f0 my parameters
exit /b

:subroutine
shift
echo Script name is %0
echo Parameters: %1 %2
exit /b

I want the call statement to be just

call :subroutine my parameters
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In a function you need to add at least one modifier to %~0.

call :test
exit /b

:test
echo 0   %0    - shows "test"
echo ~0  %~0   - shows "test"
echo ~f0 %~f0  - shows the batch name (full path)
exit /b
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Thank you. I have already noticed this after reading stackoverflow.com/questions/14559789/…. –  utapyngo Feb 10 '13 at 12:32

I believe %~nx0 will give you filename with extension and %~n0 will give you just the file name...

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I prefer using this at the top of my scripts:

set "This=%~dpnx0"

This way you still keep the full path of the currently running script. If there's the need to get just the name of the script you can use a FOR /F loop to extract it:

set "This=%~dpnx0"
echo This=%This%
for /F %%I in ('echo.%This%') do set "Name=%%~nxI"
echo Name=!Name!
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I used to think that global variables are bad. But it looks like this is not the case. –  utapyngo Feb 10 '13 at 11:06
    
@utapyngo: This is basically true but since there is no way to define constant values in Windows batch scripting I think that this is an acceptable exception. :) –  mrt Feb 10 '13 at 11:17
1  
Well, I guess you could just do set "Name=%~nx0" at the beginning. :) At the very least, your loop seems a bit overkill, you could have a simpler one: for %%I in ("%This%") do set "Name=%%~nxI". –  Andriy M Feb 10 '13 at 11:45

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