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This is pure curiosity/challenge, no practical importance at all. So I'm not looking for alternate solutions that get the job done.

From this question Most efficient way to check for DBNull and then assign to a variable? I found this answer which looks like:

oSomeObject.IntMemeber = oRow["Value"] as int? ?? iDefault;
oSomeObject.StringMember = oRow["Name"] as string ?? sDefault;

Can I move the above expressions to one generic function (or two, or more) so that it accepts both int? and string as well and that I can call it like:

oSomeObject.IntMemeber = oRow.Read<int?>("Value", 0); //iDefault is now 0
//or
oSomeObject.IntMemeber = oRow.Read<int>("Value"); //iDefault is now default(int)

//and 
oSomeObject.StringMember = oRow.Read<string>("Name"); //sDefault is now default(string)

Requirements:

1) I need an option to specify a default value in case of DBNulls. I also need an option to return default(T) in case I dont specify a default value. So this wont work:

public static T Read<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field, T defaultValue) where T : class
{
    return dr[field] as T ?? defaultValue;
}

public static T? Read<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field, T? defaultValue) where T : struct
{
    return dr[field] as T? ?? defaultValue;
}

because I cant call oSomeObject.StringMemeber = oRow.Read<string>("Name")

It need not be optional parameter, it can even be an overload:

public static T Read<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field) where T : class
{
    return dr[field] as T ?? default(T);
}

public static T? Read<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field) where T : struct
{
    return dr[field] as T? ?? default(T?);
}

public static T Read<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field, T defaultValue) where T : class
{
    return dr[field] as T ?? defaultValue;
}

public static T? Read<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field, T? defaultValue) where T : struct
{
    return dr[field] as T? ?? defaultValue;
}

This wont compile, since method 1 and 2 have just the same signature.

2) Generic functions (in case of overloads) should have the same name.

3) as keyword must be used check and cast type. As I stated previously I'm not really looking to solutions to read from IDataRecord or enhance performance or something.


There are similar questions

  1. C# generic class using reference types and nullable value types

  2. Is creating a C# generic method that accepts (nullable) value type and reference type possible?

  3. Can a Generic Method handle both Reference and Nullable Value types?

But this is very specific to as keyword. So the answers there are not applicable.

Addendum: I know there won't be one single solution to this. I will accept which is most elegant alternative.

share|improve this question
    
"Generic" mean that the same IL can be used for all types that match the constraints. The problem is that reference types and nullable value types require different IL for the same operator (as). So you need different methods. And methods with the same name must differ in their parameter lists. So unless you're looking for a solution which, for example, compiles some IL for each type at runtime, I'd say that it won't get more elegant than what you already have. – dtb Feb 10 '13 at 8:58
    
hmm, but sadly I don't already have a solution. – nawfal Feb 10 '13 at 9:01
1  
Use different names for your methods? – dtb Feb 10 '13 at 9:02
    
Yes thats always possible. Seems thats the most elegant solution :) – nawfal Feb 10 '13 at 9:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The answers you linked to seem to pretty clearly indicate that there isn't a good way to have a generic method handle both reference types and value types in the clean way you would like. It seems the answer, as shown there, is to give them different names.

You can, however, reduce your code to just two methods instead of four by using a default value for the defaultValue parameter:

public static T Read<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field, 
                        T defaultValue = null) where T : class
{
    return dr[field] as T ?? defaultValue;
}

public static T? ReadNullable<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field, 
                                 T? defaultValue = null) where T : struct
{
    return dr[field] as T? ?? defaultValue;
}

This way you can use dr.ReadNullable(field) when you want the result to be null when the value can't be cast, and dr.ReadNullable(field, someValue) when you want to specify a default value.

As discussed below, the use of default(T) and default(T?) in your original code aren't necessary, since they will always be null anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
default(T?) is null. Do you mean default(T)? – dtb Feb 10 '13 at 9:04
    
default(T?) is better isn't it? – nawfal Feb 10 '13 at 9:04
1  
x ?? null is the same as x -- why check if x is null if you return null in that case anyway? – dtb Feb 10 '13 at 9:06
1  
@dtb I was sticking as close to nawfal's original code as possible to just answer the question at hand, but it did strike me as a little odd. Nawfal, is the intention just to return a null value when the cast fails? – JLRishe Feb 10 '13 at 9:07
1  
I see. The general concensus seems that .NET can't resolve overloads based solely on generic type constraints. – JLRishe Feb 10 '13 at 9:40

Idea is to use is instead of as. Below methods will do the trick:

    public static T Read<T>(this IDictionary<string, object> dr, string field, T defaultValue)
    {
        var v = dr[field];
        return v is T ? (T)v : defaultValue;
    }

    public static T Read<T>(this IDictionary<string, object> dr, string field)
    {
        var v = dr[field];
        return v is T ? (T)v : default(T);
    }

Usage:

    Dictionary<string, object> d = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    d["s"] = "string";
    d["i"] = 5;
    d["db.null"] = DBNull.Value;

    Console.WriteLine(d.Read("i", 7));                        // 5
    Console.WriteLine(d.Read("s", "default string"));         // string
    Console.WriteLine(d.Read("db.null", "default string"));   // default string
    Console.WriteLine(d.Read("db.null", -1));                 // -1
    Console.WriteLine(d.Read<int>("i"));                      // 5
    Console.WriteLine(d.Read<string>("s"));                   // string
    Console.WriteLine(d.Read<int>("db.null"));                // 0
    Console.WriteLine(d.Read<string>("db.null") ?? "null");   // null

I have used Dictionary for quick examples, IDataRecord will behave the same way.

share|improve this answer
    
that's not my question precisely. – nawfal Feb 10 '13 at 10:00
    
@nawfal Why this is not your question? Which requirement it does not meet? – SergeyS Feb 10 '13 at 10:00
    
the third one. Not only you're reading from the reader twice, you're checking for a cast twice. as avoids that. I know these arent expensive, but that was not my question. Even in the link from which i copied the test sample has plenty of solutions that use is, including one my own. If you're really a fan of optimizations you should see that link and avoid the one you posted :) – nawfal Feb 10 '13 at 10:03
    
@nawfal The specification is clear on this point; as (in the non-dynamic case) is defined as a syntactic sugar for is. Check this article blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/09/16/… – SergeyS Feb 10 '13 at 10:08
    
@nawfal And I updated code to help you understand that accessing reader twice is not required here :) – SergeyS Feb 10 '13 at 10:11

Seems there is not one way. JLRishe's answer is good. It relies on renaming overloads. Here is something that doesn't rename functions, but compromise on ease of calling (ie one optional parameter less)

static T Read<T>(this object obj, T defaultValue) where T : class
{
    return obj as T ?? defaultValue;
}

static T? Read<T>(this object obj, T? defaultValue) where T : struct
{
    return obj as T? ?? defaultValue;
}

public static T Read<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field, 
                        T defaultValue) where T : class //no optional parameter here :(
{
    return dr[index].Read<T>(defaultValue);
}

public static T? Read<T>(this IDataRecord dr, string field, T? defaultValue = null) 
                        where T : struct
{
    return dr[index].Read<T>(defaultValue);
}

And call, for eg.:

Session s = new Session();
s.Id = r.Read("", (byte[])null);
s.UserId = (int)r.Read<int>("");
s.LoginTime = (DateTime)r.Read<DateTime>("");
s.LogoutTime = r.Read("", default(DateTime?));
s.MachineFingerprint = r.Read("", (string)null);

As you see reference types needs to be specified a default value. Not so elegant..

share|improve this answer

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