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I have method that should at the end to the same process but the can get diffrent parameters since the need to do that process in different way

my question is this is the best way to do that assuming that this is the APIs

void action(String a,String b){
    functionA();
    functionB();
    functionC();
}




void action(String a){
    functionA();
    functionC();
}


void action(String a,String B,String C){
    functionA();
    functionC();
    functionD();
}

the reason that I ask that is as you can see I always use functionA and functionC? There is more elegant way to do that in java?

share|improve this question
    
What parameters are passes to the other methods, or do they really ignore the parameters? –  Bohemian Feb 10 '13 at 10:26
    
no they actually use the parameters –  John Jerrby Feb 10 '13 at 10:27
    
Do functionA, functionB and functionC ignore them though (do they really have no parameters)? –  Bohemian Feb 10 '13 at 10:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can share code between overloaded functions, it is very logical for overloaded function to share code between them.

//this delegates what happens to 'a' to the lower link, passing the responsibility to it along the 'chain'
void action(String a,String b){
    action(a);
    functionB();
}
//this delegates what happens to 'a' to the lower link, passing the responsibility to it along the 'chain'
void action(String a,String B,String C){
    action(a);
    functionD();
}
//this is the lowest link in your chain of responsibility, it handles the one parameter case
void action(String a){
    functionA();
    functionC();
} 
share|improve this answer
    
the problem is that the order that I should use them can be changed for instance in some method i can call b before a ... –  John Jerrby Feb 10 '13 at 10:29
    
Then you can change action(String a,String b) overload to call functionB(); before action(a). The important thing to take from this is the fact you're delegating responsibility to other overloads, this is somewhat of a en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chain-of-responsibility_pattern –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 10 '13 at 10:32
    
Thanks but Im not sure that i fully understand ,in the third action you put a before c but if for example between them I need to put another operation or for instance I need to change the order for C before a so the last action is not valid i think ...what do you think? –  John Jerrby Feb 10 '13 at 11:16
    
@JohnJerrby does your action function for (a) represent a sub-problem or simpler case of what your action function does for (a,b) or (a,b,c) ? If it doesn't the methods should not be overloaded but named differently (since they perform different logical tasks). If they do than is it possible that action(a) 'wraps' the other two functions? (meaning every action(a,b) is actually wrapped in action(a) (perform first part of action(a), then inner logic dictated by action(a,b), then rest of action(a) and the same for action(a,b,c)) –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 10 '13 at 11:20
    
Thanks got your point –  John Jerrby Feb 10 '13 at 11:37

Your question is not very clear, but have a look at the Command Pattern. You could actually build commands from different sub-commands.

Something like this?

public class CommandExample {

    private final Map<String, Command> availableCommands;

    CommandExample() {
        availableCommands = new HashMap<>();
        List<Command> cmds = Arrays.asList(new Command[]{new CommandA(), new CommandB(), new CommandC(), new CommandD()});
        for (Command cmd:cmds)
            availableCommands.put(cmd.getId(), cmd);
    }
    public interface Command {
        public String getId();
        public void action();
    }

    public class CommandA implements Command {
        @Override 
        public String getId() {
            return "A";
        }
        @Override
        public void action() {
            // do my action A
        }
    }
    public class CommandB implements Command {
        @Override 
        public String getId() {
            return "B";
        }
        @Override
        public void action() {
            // do my action B
        }
    }
    public class CommandC implements Command {
        @Override 
        public String getId() {
            return "B";
        }
        @Override
        public void action() {
            // do my action C
        }
    }
    public class CommandD implements Command {
        @Override 
        public String getId() {
            return "C";
        }
        @Override
        public void action() {
            // do my action D
        }
    }


    public void execute(String[] input) {
        for (String in: input) {
            availableCommands.get(in).action();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This should be a comment, it does not solve OP's problem but rather suggest an approach. Please see the FAQ stackoverflow.com/faq –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 10 '13 at 10:33
    
right - working on it –  michael_s Feb 10 '13 at 10:39

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