Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am implementing an example given in the book The Elements of Statistical Learning: Data Mining, Inference, and Prediction (Hashtle, Tibshirani, Friedman).

My aim is to generate 10+10 means from two bivariate normal distributions, then use the first ten means to generate points labelled "Green" and the other ten means to generate "Red" points. The mean value of the bivariate gaussian from which a point must be generated has to be picked randomly every time. I am not too familiar with R, so I used the for-loop, using which it takes an awful lot of time as n gets bigger. Here's my code:

Sigma = diag(2)
greenMeans= mvrnorm(n=10, c(1,0), Sigma)
redMeans= mvrnorm(n=10, c(0,1), Sigma)

n=1000000
green<- array(dim=c(n,2))
red<- array(dim=c(n,2))

for (i in 1:n)
        {
            newGreen<- mvrnorm(n=1,greenMeans[sample(c(1:10),1,replace=TRUE),], Sigma/5)
            newRed<- mvrnorm(n=1,redMeans[sample(c(1:10),1,replace=TRUE),], Sigma/5)
            green[i,1] <- newGreen[1]
            green[i,2] <- newGreen[2]
            red[i,1] <- newRed[1]
            red[i,2] <- newRed[2]
    }
share|improve this question

You can skip the for loop entirely and use replicate, not sure how much faster it is though:

do_stuff = function() {
   newGreen<- mvrnorm(n=1,greenMeans[sample(c(1:10),1,replace=TRUE),], Sigma/5)
   newRed<- mvrnorm(n=1,redMeans[sample(c(1:10),1,replace=TRUE),], Sigma/5)         
   return(list(newGreen, newRed))
 }
replicate(10000, do_stuff)   
share|improve this answer
    
those two commands aren't equivalent, sample(redMeans, 1, replace = TRUE) doesn't take into account the fact that we have a two-dimensional array in our hands; it picks a random number from the 20 scalars in the vector. It should pick a random point from the vector redMeans. Also, mu argument of mvrnorm doesn't work like that. mu is a vector giving the means of the variables, not the vector that contains the means for every single point. – jsonaj Feb 10 '13 at 11:47
    
@user2058602 I removed the wrong and speculative part of my answer. – Paul Hiemstra Feb 10 '13 at 11:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.