Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have this simple code:

class A{};
class B : public A{};
class C : public B{};

class Test
{
    public:
        template<typename T>
        void f(T&){printf("template\n");}
        void f(A&){printf("specialization\n");}
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    B b;
    C c;

    Test test;
    test.f(a);
    test.f(b);
    test.f(c);
}

When I run it(VS2010) I have this output:

specialization
template
template

Is it possible to make the calls with A-derived classes to use specialization?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean exactly? The question is totaly ambiguous – Desolator Feb 10 '13 at 11:37
1  
@Desolator He means he wants anything that derives from A as well as A instances themselves to use the override to an A-reference rather than the generic template expansion. His calls to use foo() with B and C instances are using the generic, not the override. – WhozCraig Feb 10 '13 at 11:39
    
@WhozCraig Thanks! This is exactly what I want. A-derived classes have a function that I need to call. The other types don't have this function and I need to use traits instead. – Felics Feb 10 '13 at 11:41
    
@Felics you should probably know this right now. That "specialization" isn't. Its an overload. There is a world of difference. – WhozCraig Feb 10 '13 at 11:42
    
@WhozCraig Yes, you are right, but in my case the behavior is the same:) – Felics Feb 10 '13 at 11:48
up vote 15 down vote accepted

Yes, it is possible, but you have to change your code a bit.

First of all, to be technical, the second function f() is not a specialization of the template function, but an overload. When resolving overload, the template version is chosen for all arguments whose type is not A, because it is a perfect match: T is deduced to be equal to the type of the argument, so when calling f(b), for instance, after type deduction the compiler will have to choose between the following two overloads:

void f(B&){printf("template\n");}
void f(A&){printf("specialization\n");}

Of course, the first one is a better match.

Now if you want the second version to be selected when the function is invoked with an argument which is a subclass of A, you have to use some SFINAE technique to prevent the function template from being correctly instantiated when the type T is deduced to be a subclass of A.

You can use std::enable_if in combination with the std::is_base_of type traits to achieve that.

// This will get instantiated only for those T which are not derived from A
template<typename T,
    typename enable_if<
        !is_base_of<A, T>::value
        >::type* = nullptr
    >
void f(T&) { cout << "template" << endl; }

Here is how you would use it in a complete program:

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A{};
class B : public A{};
class C : public B{};
class D {};

class Test
{
    public:

        template<typename T,
            typename enable_if<!is_base_of<A, T>::value>::type* = nullptr
            >
        void f(T&) { cout << ("template\n"); }

        void f(A&){ cout << ("non-template\n");}

};

int main()
{
    A a;
    B b;
    C c;
    D d;
    float f;

    Test test;
    test.f(a); // Will print "non-template"
    test.f(b); // Will print "non-template"
    test.f(c); // Will print "non-template"
    test.f(d); // Will print "template"
    test.f(f); // Will print "template"
}

EDIT:

If you are working with a compiler which is not fully compliant with C++11 (and therefore does not support default template arguments on function templates), you might want to change the definition of your template overload of f() as follows:

template<typename T>
typename enable_if<!is_base_of<A, T>::value, void>::type 
f(T&) { cout << ("template\n"); }

The behavior of the program will be identical. Note that if the return type of f() is void, you can omit the second argument to the enable_if class template.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 to you Andy. I was about to start typing up the SFINAE answer to this, thanks for saving me the keystrokes =) – WhozCraig Feb 10 '13 at 11:46
    
@WhozCraig: Thank you :-) – Andy Prowl Feb 10 '13 at 11:46
    
Note: the p name is optional in the template parameter list. – Matthieu M. Feb 10 '13 at 15:30
    
@MatthieuM.: Correct. I'll remove it – Andy Prowl Feb 10 '13 at 15:33
    
@AndyProwl Thanks for help. Unfortunately this is not compiling in VS2010: error C4519: default template arguments are only allowed on a class template – Felics Feb 10 '13 at 20:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.