Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have html with class that always differs depending on amount of elements inside it(ul>li...) class name has pattern like sf-single-children-* where * always different depending on li's inside it. How do i get this * with javascript, so i could style depending on this number?

Example code:

<ul class='someclass'>
    <li class="sf-single-children-* some-other-classes-here-aswell">
        <ul style="width: * ">
            <li>Item with no children element</li>
            <li>Item with no children element</li>
            <li>Item with no children element</li>
            <li>Item with no children element</li>
            <li>Item with no children element</li>
            <li>Item with childer element which should not be counted
              <ul>
                 <li>Item with no children element</li>
                 <li>Item with no children element</li>
                 <li>Item with no children element</li>
              </ul>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

The other way how i'd do this its count elements in only parent <ul> But i'm not sure how to do that

share|improve this question
2  
This sounds like a bad solution to an easy problem. Is there no way you could use a single class on all elements and use DOM traversal like $(element).children().length to get the number of child elements? –  Rory McCrossan Feb 10 '13 at 13:28
    
The problem is - i can't use children because there are more tags like structure above in my code, so if i do that ill get enormous number instead of what i need –  sanny Sin Feb 10 '13 at 13:30
1  
There's always a way to get the elements you need ;) Could you post a more complete example of your HTML and state exactly which elements you need to count. –  Rory McCrossan Feb 10 '13 at 13:31
    
updated code with general structure –  sanny Sin Feb 10 '13 at 13:33
    
So in your example you're looking to count the li elements which don't have a ul within them? So the answer there would be 5 - is that right? –  Rory McCrossan Feb 10 '13 at 13:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK, the easiest solution is definitely to just get the last character of the class name.

This code will get the first class of the specified element and get all the characters after the last dash.

var number
function getVal() {
    var cls = $(".someclass > li").attr('class').split(' ')[0];
    number = cls.substr(cls.lastIndexOf("-") + 1);
}

Just make sure that:

  1. This class is always first
  2. The class is always formatted this way

If you want it as a number instead of a strong, you'll have to convert it.

DEMO

share|improve this answer

You can use jquery selectors like below

$('ul > li[class^="sf-single-children-"]').each(function(){
   // u get all the 'li' elements with class starting with 'sf-single-children-'
   // you can check the class with $(this).attr('class').split('-')[3];
});
share|improve this answer
3  
Wouldn't $(this).attr('class').split('-').pop() be much easier, and less reliant on the number of - characters? –  David Thomas Feb 10 '13 at 13:41
    
I second you @DavidThomas :-) –  Maddy Feb 10 '13 at 13:41
    
this returns me empty array –  sanny Sin Feb 10 '13 at 13:45

Given your comments on your requirements, the following will work:

$('.someclass > li').each(function() {
    var liCount = $('> ul > li', this).filter(function() {
        return $(this).children('ul').length == 0;
    }).length;
});

Example fiddle

share|improve this answer
var star = $(".someclass li").attr("class").split("sf-single-children-")[1];
share|improve this answer

Given structure like yours. How to get li's with the said class containing sf-single-children-N and get the N (jQuery based solution):

$('li[class*="sf-single-children-"]').each(function () {
    var classNames = this.className.split(' '),
        count;

    for (var i=0; !count && i<classNames.length; i++)
        if (classNames[i].indexOf('sf-single-children-') == 0)
            count = parseInt(classNames[i].replace('sf-single-children-', ''), 10);

    // there you have it in the count
    // with `this` being the element currently being inspected
});

You can have other classes in the class name, as well.

The vanilla Javascript solution (sans-jQuery):

var elements = document.getElementsByTagName('li');
for (var i=0; i<elements.length; i++) {
    if (elements[i].className.indexOf('sf-single-children-') < 0)
        continue;

    var classes = elements[i].className.split(' '),
        count = 0;

    for (var j=0; !count && j<classes.length; j++)
        if (classes[j].indexOf('sf-single-children-') == 0)
            count = parseInt(classes[j].replace('sf-single-children-', ''), 10);

    // count contains the number you need
    // elements[i] contains the element
};

But if you want to do the counting on the client, given that the li elements you want the find out the number of ul > li child nodes for have the count-child-nodes class name, you can do it (with jQuery):

$('li.count-child-nodes').each(function () {
    var count = $(this).find('> ul > li').length;

    // you have the count here
});

...or without jQuery:

var els = document.getElementsByTagName('li');
for (var i=0; i<els.length; i++) {
    var el = els[i];
    if (!/\bcount-child-nodes\b/.test(el.className))
        continue;

    for (var j=0, count=0; j<el.children.length; j++) {
        var ul = el.children[j];
        if (ul.nodeName.toLowerCase() != 'ul')
            continue;

        for (var k=0; k<ul.children.length; k++) {
            if (ul.children[k].nodeName.toLowerCase() == 'li')
                count++;
        }
    }

    // the count has your number
};
share|improve this answer

This may help, it shows how to extract the classname from the element, and break up that name so that the "*" you describe can be used.

var haystack = document.querySelector("ul>li");
var needle = haystack.getAttribute("class").split("-").pop();
console.log(needle);

If you mean multiple classes within a single class definition then:

var haystack = document.querySelector("ul>li");
for (var i=0; i<haystack.classList.length; i++) {
  var needle = haystack.classList[i].split("-").pop();
  console.log(needle);
}

If you mean multiple nodes then extending the previous example:

var haystack = document.querySelectorAll("ul>li");

for (var h=0; h<haystack.length; h++) {
  for (var i=0; i<haystack[h].classList.length; i++) {
    var needle = haystack[h].classList[i].split("-").pop();
    console.log(needle);
  }
}

Example: http://jsbin.com/igowaw/7/

Based on the latest mod to the original, does this do what you're looking for?

var haystack = document.querySelectorAll("ul>li");
for (var h=0; h<haystack.length; h++) {
  for (var i=0; i<haystack[h].classList.length; i++) {
    var c = haystack[h].classList[i];
    if (c.indexOf("sf-single-children") === 0) {
      var needle = c.split("-").pop();
      console.log(needle);
    }
  }
}

Example: http://jsbin.com/igowaw/8/edit

share|improve this answer
    
what if i have multiple classes? –  sanny Sin Feb 10 '13 at 13:59
    
[Extended original answer] Assuming you mean multiple classes for the first node, then... jsbin.com/igowaw/4 –  Rich Boakes Feb 10 '13 at 14:57

Reading between the lines here, it looks like you know on the server side how many elements there are that have no children. If you're building in HTML5 you're probably better off using a data attribute for this, rather than passing it in the class, thus:

<ul class='someclass'>
    <li class="some-other-classes-here-aswell" data-single-children="2">
        <ul style="width: * ">
            <li>Item with no children element</li>
            <li>Item with no children element</li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

You can then access that data:

var x = document.querySelector("[data-single-children]");
console.log(x.dataset.singleChildren);

Example: http://jsbin.com/uqadub/1/edit

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.