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I have a base class which I am extending, but I can't work out why the variables I am defining in the base class arn't accessible by the child class. I understood that they had to be protected to allow access, but they still won't work for me.

class user {

    protected static $username;
    protected static $password;
    protected static $remember;

    function __construct() {

    }

    public function login($username, $password, $remember) {

        $this->username = $username;
        $this->password = $password;
        $this->remember = $remember;

        $login = new login();

    }

}

class login extends user {

    function __construct() {

        print("user is: " . $this->username);

        die();

    }
}
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In addition to the variables being static, they are not initialized in the shown program flow. –  scones Feb 10 '13 at 13:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You variables in the base class are static and a better understand of inheritance.

You need this instead:

class user {

    protected $username;
    protected $password;
    protected $remember;

    public function __construct($username, $password, $remember) {
        $this->username = $username;
        $this->password = $password;
        $this->remember = $remember;
    }
}

class login extends user {

    public function __construct($username, $password, $remember) {
        parent::__construct($username, $password, $remember);
        print("user is: " . $this->username);
    }
}

$user = new login('joe bloggs', 'a password', TRUE);
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@WilliamHand - Does the above work for you and is what you require? –  Ed Heal Feb 10 '13 at 14:00
    
Yes it works a treat, thank you! –  William Hand Feb 10 '13 at 14:02
    
@WilliamHand - Rather one for the reputation and perhaps an accept. –  Ed Heal Feb 10 '13 at 14:05

Because variables should be non static. If you want static variables (like you do know) it should look like that

print("user is: " . self::$username);
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this would make more sense:

class user {

    protected $username;
    protected $password;
    protected $remember;

    public function __construct($username, $password, $remember) {
        $this->username = $username;
        $this->password = $password;
        $this->remember = $remember;
    }

    public static function login($username, $password, $remember) {
        return new login($username, $password, $remember);
    }

}

class login extends user {

    public function __construct($username, $password, $remember) {
        parent::__construct($username, $password, $remember);

        print("user is: " . $this->username);

        die();

    }
}

$foo = new user::login('foo', 'bar', 'meh');
share|improve this answer
    
I agree makes more sense, but I kept getting unexpected T_STRING, expecting T_VARIABLE or '$' when I ran that last line - not sure why? –  William Hand Feb 10 '13 at 14:02
    
besides the point, where i still have an error in the code (about to be fixed). on what line does the error show up? –  scones Feb 10 '13 at 14:04
    
Line 1 of my page that calls the class page, aka exclusively the last line. –  William Hand Feb 10 '13 at 14:05

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