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Just really looking for an explanation of the following, if the variable digest isn't allocated manually then data returned by CFDataCreateWithBytesNoCopy() continuously changes when referenced throughout the program.

CFDataRef sha1(CFStringRef string)
{
    unsigned char* digest = malloc(CC_SHA1_DIGEST_LENGTH);

    const char* cData  = CFStringGetCStringPtr(string, CFStringGetFastestEncoding(string));
    CC_SHA1(cData, strlen(cData), digest);
    CFDataRef sha = CFDataCreateWithBytesNoCopy(kCFAllocatorDefault, digest, CC_SHA1_DIGEST_LENGTH, kCFAllocatorDefault);
    free(digest);
    CFRelease(string);
    return sha;
}

Where as this wont work...

CFDataRef sha1(CFStringRef string)
{
    unsigned char digest[CC_SHA1_DIGEST_LENGTH];

    const char* cData  = CFStringGetCStringPtr(string, CFStringGetFastestEncoding(string));
    CC_SHA1(cData, strlen(cData), digest);
    CFDataRef sha = CFDataCreateWithBytesNoCopy(kCFAllocatorDefault, digest, CC_SHA1_DIGEST_LENGTH, kCFAllocatorDefault);
    return sha;
}

Also are there any memory leaks in the top code?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Second parameter of CFDataCreateWithBytesNoCopy is a "pointer to the byte buffer to be used as the backing store of the CFData object" and in the Discussion section, you will find "the created object does not copy the external buffer to internal storage but instead uses the buffer as its backing store".

Now in your code unsigned char digest[CC_SHA1_DIGEST_LENGTH]; is an array with automatic storage duration, which means that it is deallocated once the execution leaves the scope where it is defined.

Note that documentation also states that the external buffer is deallocated when the CFData object is deallocated.

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