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I have a simple ordered list which in each has a menu tag and some list items such as:

<ol>
    <li>
        <h2>List item 1</h2>
        <menu>
            <li><a href="#">Action 1</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Action 2</a></li>
        </menu>
    </li>
    <li>
        <h2>List item 2</h2>
        <menu>
            <li><a href="#">Action 1</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Action 2</a></li>
        </menu>
    </li>
</ol>

Unfortunately with this markup, the numbering of the outer list items gets affected by the list items inside the menu.

So the second outer list item should be numbered 2 but infact it is numbered 4.

How can this be avoided?

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That's because you're using <menu> instead of <ul> on your 2nd level. Does the <menu> tag even exist in html? –  onetrickpony Feb 10 '13 at 14:19
    
I think menu is valid since it is a menu of actions for that particular part of the content. –  Marty Wallace Feb 10 '13 at 14:21
    
OneTrickPony is right, <menu> doesn't add a new level to the list as <ul> would do, therefore it won't behave like there is a 2nd level. –  Frederik.L Feb 10 '13 at 14:30
    
I know, but menu is more semantically correct. I am wondering the best way to get these to play nice together –  Marty Wallace Feb 10 '13 at 14:40
    
<nav> is the semantic element in HTML5 that would be used in this context. I'd be tempted to wrap the parent <ol> in a <nav> block if "List item 1" and "List item 2" are themselves part of the menu structure, or around the child <ol> elements if these are discrete and separate menus. In either case the nav would be used in addition to, not in place of, the <ol> or <ul>. See developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/HTML/Element/nav –  pwdst Feb 10 '13 at 17:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a bug in some browsers. Chrome gets the numbering wrong, IE and Firefox get it right.

Fixing this with CSS would get a bit tricky, so it is best to use ul instead of menu. According to HTML 4.01 spec, the menu element is a deprecated element similar to ul but intended to be rendered as a menu list, but in practice browsers display it like ul. But as observed here, there is a bugs in the Chrome implementation – yet another reason to use ul instead of menu, as strongly recommended in the spec.

(HTML5 proposes to redefine menu in a complicated manner, making it even less suitable for a simple itemized list.)

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