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I'm attempting to pass a pointer to a pointer (char**) into a function that will initialize it, and then pass it into another function that will free the memory, however I'm getting seg faults on the freeing which leads me to believe my allocation is going wrong.

Valgrind is reporting use of uninitalized value at this line. tmp[i] is pointing to 0x0.

if(tmp[i]) free((char*)tmp[i]);

Here is the code (this is only test code)

void 
alloc_strings(char ***test, int count) 
{
  char **tmp = *test;
  tmp = malloc(count * sizeof(char*));

  int i;
  for(i = 0; i < count; i++) {
    tmp[i] = malloc(6);
    strcpy(tmp[i],"Hello");
  }
}

void
free_strings(char ***test, int count)
{
  char **tmp = *test;

  int i;
  for(i = 0; i < count; i++) {
    if(tmp[i]) free((char*)tmp[i]);
  }

  if(tmp)
    free(tmp);
}

And the invocation:

int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{

  char **test;
  alloc_strings(&test, 10);
  free_strings(&test, 10);

  return 0;
}

I have been playing around with this for a while, reading up on pointers etc however can't get my head around the issue. Any thoughts greatly appreciated!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to assign to *test, not to assign from it. How about:

void 
alloc_strings(char ***test, int count) 
{
    char **tmp = malloc(count * sizeof *tmp);
    /*...*/
    *test = tmp;
}
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exactly. twice (also in the destructor) –  wildplasser Feb 10 '13 at 14:58
    
@wildplasser I think the destructor is fine, just a little overcomplicated. –  cnicutar Feb 10 '13 at 14:59
    
It is fine (it destructs ...) , but you'd expect it to set *test=NULL;, too before returning. (BTW: the constructor has a potential memoryleak, if *test happens to point to a previously allocated array) –  wildplasser Feb 10 '13 at 15:02
    
@cnicutar That's great thank you, I think I understand however will need to spend more time on this. As for the destructor it was just quick and dirty when moving code around. Thanks again. –  Eddie Feb 10 '13 at 15:04
    
@wildplasser I see what you mean, you're right. –  cnicutar Feb 10 '13 at 15:19
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In the code example,

alloc_strings(char ***test, int count) 
{
    char **tmp = *test;

*test should have some space to store a pointer to char ** which currently is not allocated. Hence, if the example is as this

char** array[1];

alloc_strings(&array[0], 7);

I feel that the code will work.

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