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I know in C, one way to solve the "initializer element is not constant" error is to create the strcuture inside the main() function. But suppose that I have an array of structs and want to use it as a global array. How can I create and initialize it?

struct A *b = malloc(10*sizeof(struct A)); // Want to keep the malloc
void init_A_types(struct A* t)
{
  t->elm1=0; t->elm2=1;
}
...
int Main() {
  for (k=0;k<10;k++)
  init_A_types(b+k);
  ...
  return 0;
}
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want an array, why don't you declare it as an array?

struct A {
    const char *str;
    int n;
};

struct A b[3] = {
    {
        "foo", 1
    },
    {
        "bar", 2
    },
    {
        "baz", 3
    }
};

If you want a global pointer, then use a global pointer:

struct A *b;

int main()
{
    b = malloc(sizeof(*b) * 10);

    // do stuff

    free(b);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but what if "10" in my example is "10000"? and I also want to malloc it on the heap. –  Computer_guy Feb 10 '13 at 15:09
    
@Computer_guy Sorry. Then you're going to type during a long period. If you want malloc() (Why on Earth would you need it?), then use a global pointer and malloc() it in main(). Really, you seem to be worrying about this too much. Use arrays for what they are for, use pointers for what they are for, and try to do something instead of worrying. –  user529758 Feb 10 '13 at 15:10
    
Thanks. I don't know why I made it complicated. Yes, the use of a global pointer and the malloc() it in the main() is the answer. Can you edit your main post so I can mark it as the answer? –  Computer_guy Feb 10 '13 at 15:16
    
About the use of malloc(), I think some advantage of the heap over the stack could be convincing. Right? –  Computer_guy Feb 10 '13 at 15:17
    
@Computer_guy No. If you have a global array, that doesn't go to the stack. –  user529758 Feb 10 '13 at 15:18
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In your program, you could consider modifying this statement struct A *b = malloc(10*sizeof(struct A)); to struct A b[10]; and the rest of the program could be the same.

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Thanks, but the size of my array is not really 10. I want to malloc it on the heap –  Computer_guy Feb 10 '13 at 15:10
    
Why do you want to malloc it on the heap? If it's a CONSTANT size, there is no benefit in having it on the heap - just more complications. –  Mats Petersson Feb 10 '13 at 15:11
1  
Then please try struct A *b; and malloc for the same inside the main function prior to the loop. Please do ensure that the memory is freed before main ends. –  Ganesh Feb 10 '13 at 15:12
1  
You still need whatever amount of bytes to store it. If it's not initialized, it will take up no space in the executable file. But by having a constant address, it probably gives a slight advantage in speed to access. And there is no need to remember to free it, checking if it allocted successfully, etc. –  Mats Petersson Feb 10 '13 at 15:21
1  
@Ganesh Why would you need to free anything before the main ends, as everything it is going to be freed anyway? –  user1944441 Feb 10 '13 at 16:06
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