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I have a table with variable-width cells, and I want to give the browser the option to insert a line break before a slash, without forcing it. I tried this by inserting a zero-width space (ZWSP) character before the slash, and it works fine in all the browsers I tested it in, except IE6 and IE8.

For IE6, I use some Javascript to replace the character with a <wbr> tag -- not the most elegant solution, but it works.

In IE8, I haven't found a practical way of working around it. It messes up the layout of my table. I found out that it is not limited just to tables. It seems to happen with any kind of element. The browser refuses to acknowledge the ZWSP, choosing instead to let the text flow out of the box, which looks ugly. I have noticed that I can make the browser handle it properly by putting it into compatibility view, but that causes other problems for me.

Does anyone know of a simple and practical way to make the ZWSP behave the way it is supposed to in IE8?

You can use this code to test the issue:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html><head>
<title>zwsp test</title>
</head>
<body>
<div style="width: 50px; border: solid black 1px; font-size: 15px">
    Miles&#8203;/gallon
</div>
</body></html>
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I would suggest making the rest of your site work with compatibility view, as some people still use IE7 and would get the broken layout. IMO, better for it to work in IE7 than not work in IE7 and work in IE8. –  strager Sep 25 '09 at 23:37
    
It works fine in IE7. I'm trying to make it work in IE8, preferably without forcing compatibility mode. –  Elias Zamaria Sep 25 '09 at 23:40
    
Have you seen this discussion? groups.google.com/group/comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html/… –  kangax Sep 26 '09 at 1:54
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suspect this might be a bug in IE8. The only way I can induce the behaviour you want is to change the slash for a division slash (\u2215):

Miles&#8203;&#x2215;gallon

For some reason IE8 doesn't like the close proximity of the slash.

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2  
It seems like you can always count on Microsoft to complicate things. For every bug they fixed in IE8, it seems like they introduced a new bug. Anyway, I tried your solution and it worked. Thank you. –  Elias Zamaria Sep 28 '09 at 18:17
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<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html><head>
<title>zwsp test</title>
<style type="text/css" media="screen">
    .zwsp {
        display: -moz-inline-box; /* Firefox before 3.0 */
        height: 1px; /* Firefox before 3.0 screws up line height */
        display: inline-block; /* Standards-based browsers (and IE!) */
        overflow: hidden; /* In most cases will prevent weird spacing due to font sizes */
        width: 1px; /* Must take up some space to appear in layout */
        margin-left: -1px; /* Cancel the space it takes up */
    }
</style>
</head>
<body>
<!-- Wide (without space) -->
<div style="width: 100px; border: solid black 1px; font-size: 15px">
    Miles/gallon
</div>
<!-- Wide (with space) -->
<div style="width: 100px; border: solid black 1px; font-size: 15px">
    Miles<span class="zwsp"> </span>/gallon
</div>
<!-- Narrow (with space) -->
<div style="width: 50px; border: solid black 1px; font-size: 15px">
    Miles<span class="zwsp"> </span>/gallon
</div>
</body></html>

Edit: the downside of this approach is, of course, that the text itself is altered. This can affect stuff like what appears in search engine results. Of course you can serve it without the .zwsp elements to spiders. Up to you how much this matters, and whether there are other cases where the presence of an actual space character may affect output in other scenarios.

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Your solution looks clever, but too complex and hacky for me. I may try it out of curiosity some day, but I am probably not willing to use it on my site. I don't think it is worth introducing that much complexity to work around a fairly minor IE8 rendering bug. –  Elias Zamaria Sep 28 '09 at 18:15
    
Suit yourself, but I don't really see what's so complex about a span with a class name. –  eyelidlessness Sep 28 '09 at 18:21
    
One of the complications with these things, especially as it applies to slashes and the like is that copy/paste will pick up the hidden space so a URL will break if you copy it. Not applicable to all scenarios, but and advantage to the word-break tag is that it's clipboard friendly. –  TheXenocide Jun 30 '10 at 14:19
    
Thanks, you saved my day with this solution. –  Boldewyn Oct 20 '10 at 12:16
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