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I'm serializing two int jagged arrays (int[4096][4096] x2). Most of their values are 0. But serialized file have 128MB of NUL values... Also, deserializing that big object takes a while. What is the best option to reduce file weight without hurt on performance?

I'm using binary serialization and I would like to stay with that.

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What sort of serialization are you using? xml? binary? –  Jason Haley Feb 10 '13 at 16:53
2  
What are you looking for, magic? –  Ondrej Tucny Feb 10 '13 at 17:29
    
@OndrejTucny no, I'm looking for some kind of on-fly compression, but dunno how to make it. –  DeX3r Feb 10 '13 at 17:47
    
I've found a nice overview article on the topic: bambus.iel.waw.pl/pliki/ogolne/prace%20IEL/247/16.pdf It probably takes more than a simple run-length encoding of the LZW algorithm. –  Axel Kemper Feb 10 '13 at 18:46
    
If I were using my own file format, as I used to before knowing about Serialization, it would not be a problem at all. But now, when I have discovered the awesomeness of Serialization, some things are extremely easy, but some... undoable? –  DeX3r Feb 10 '13 at 19:20

1 Answer 1

If deserializing the whole object takes too long, then it's likely that the bottleneck is the disk. If that's the case, then you don't need to worry about CPU and you can use compression.

The simplest way to use compression in .Net is to use GZipStream by wrapping the actual Stream you're using (most likely a FileStream).

This will result in smaller size of your file (especially if it contains lots of zeros), but it will also slow down the de-/serialization.

Using a single 4096 × 4096 jagged integer array with various fraction of zeros and with or without compression, I got the following results:

  • all zeroes
    • Direct
      • Size: 64,1 MB
      • Serialization: 0,10 s
      • Deserialization: 0,10 s
    • Compressed
      • Size: 0,1 MB
      • Serialization: 0,93 s
      • Deserialization: 0,56 s
  • tenth zeroes
    • Direct
      • Size: 64,1 MB
      • Serialization: 0,09 s
      • Deserialization: 0,09 s
    • Compressed
      • Size: 9,8 MB
      • Serialization: 1,88 s
      • Deserialization: 0,74 s
  • half zeroes
    • Direct
      • Size: 64,1 MB
      • Serialization: 0,09 s
      • Deserialization: 0,09 s
    • Compressed
      • Size: 38,6 MB
      • Serialization: 5,99 s
      • Deserialization: 1,51 s
  • no zeroes
    • Direct
      • Size: 64,1 MB
      • Serialization: 0,10 s
      • Deserialization: 0,09 s
    • Compressed
      • Size: 64,1 MB
      • Serialization: 2,99 s
      • Deserialization: 0,41 s

This is using MemoryStream, which means it pretty much measure only CPU overhead. If you're going to use FileStream, the difference is likely to be smaller.

As you can see, the size can be significantly smaller, but the time is also increased by a lot, especially for serialization.

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This is an idea, but wont work for me. I want to read data from HDD few times and so long decomperession and compression time is not too good. Eventually I will serialize my objects normally, and these arrays will be saved in sub-folder, each 2 in another file in my own file format. Thanks anyway! –  DeX3r Feb 10 '13 at 20:23

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