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The below code in unix takes ~9s reported by time command.

int main()
{
    double u = 0;
    double v = 0;
    double w = 0;
    int i;
    for (i = 0;i < 1000000000;++i) {
        v *= w;
        u += v;
    }
    printf("%lf\n",u);
}

I don't understand why the execution times almost double when i change v *= w;withv *= u;

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2  
w is always zero. The compiler is probably smart enough not to run that loop at all in the first case since v will also always be zero, and thus u too. (Might be harder to figure out with the interdependency between u and v.) –  Mat Feb 10 '13 at 16:31
1  
Did you look at the generated code? –  Carl Norum Feb 10 '13 at 16:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you change v *= w to v *= u then there is an inter-dependency between the 2 statements. Hence, the first statement has to be completed before executing u += v which could be the reason for the increased performance as the compiler can't parallelize the execution.

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Probably because the compiler sees that w is never modified, and so can be compiled into a constant whereas the variable u is modified and so must have its own memory.

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Compiler optimizes v*= w; to v = 0; and the probably u += v to u = 0; So those operations never happen.

Here is the test i did. Every version was done 10 times and averaged.

for (i = 0;i < 1000000000;++i) {
    v *= w;
    u += v;
}

4.0373 seconds



for (i = 0;i < 1000000000;++i) {
    v *= u;
    u += v;
}

7.3733 seconds



for (i = 0;i < 1000000000;++i) {
    v *= 0;
    u += 0;
}

4.0149 seconds

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1  
why it doesn't do the same with v *= u; since is 0 as well –  curious Feb 10 '13 at 16:34
    
Probably can't optimize v *= u and u += v out since they are dependant on each other. –  user1944441 Feb 10 '13 at 16:43
1  
@curious it takes an extra step of reasoning though (it first has to find out that v is constant zero, then that u never changes and remains zero - in the other case, it just has to see that w is constant zero), that could make a difference. –  harold Feb 10 '13 at 16:43

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