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So I have this project I am working on and I need to create my own ArrayList class for it. I have all my methods defined, but when I compile I keep getting a "cannot find symbol" error for three of my methods. I have an interface that looks like this:

public interface FBList {

    public int size();

public void insert(int i, Person person);

public Person remove(int i);

public Person lookUp(int i);

/**
*A class that defines a person
**/
public class Person {
    private String id;
    private long phoneNum;

    public Person(String personID, long phoneNum){
        id = personID;
        phoneNum = phoneNum;
    }
}

As you can see, I have an inner class in there. I am trying to use that class in my other file which implements this interface. Currently, the three methods in my other file giving me the issue are as follows:

/**
    * A method to expand the size of the array if the array is too small
    * @param i  One minus the place in the list where the component will be inserted
    * @param Person The person to be put in the list
    **/
    protected void expandInsert(int i, Person person){
        Person[] temp = new Person[arrayList.length * 2];
        for(int index = 0; index < temp.length; index++){
            if( i != index){
                if(i > 0)
                    temp[index] = arrayList[index];
                if(i == 0)
                    temp[index + 1] = arrayList[index];
            }
            else{
                temp[i] = person;
                i = 0;
                index--;
            }
        }
        arrayList = temp;
    }

/**
    * Inserts a new component at the end of a list by creating a new list longer that then last
    * @param i The place in the list where the component will be inserted
    * @param Person The person to be added to the list
    **/

protected void insertAtEnd(int i, Person person){
    Person[] temp = new Person[arrayList.length + 5];
    for(int index = 0; index < temp.length; index++){
        if(index != i){
            temp[index] = arrayList[index];
        }
        else{
            temp[index] = person;
        }
    }
    arrayList = temp;
}

/**
* Shrinks the array by one by removing one component from the array
* @param i The index to be removed
**/

protected void shrink(int i){
    Person[] temp = new Person[arrayList.length - 1];
    for (int index = 0; index < arrayList.length ; index++ ) {
        if (index < i) {
            temp[index] = arrayList[index];
        }
        else if (index == i){
            removedPerson = arrayList[index];
            temp[index] = arrayList[index + 1];
        }
        else{
            temp[index - 1] = arrayList[index];
        }
    }
}

All of these files are in the same folder, so there shouldn't be an issue there. I am using terminal to compile by typing "javac FBArrayList.java". My compiler output looks like this:

 FBArrayList.java:106: cannot find symbol
symbol  : method expandInsert(int,FBList.Person)
location: class FBList.Person[]
            arrayList.expandInsert(i, person);
                     ^
FBArrayList.java:108: cannot find symbol
symbol  : method insertAtEnd(int,FBList.Person)
location: class FBList.Person[]
            arrayList.insertAtEnd(i, person);
                     ^
FBArrayList.java:118: cannot find symbol
symbol  : method shrink(int)
location: class FBList.Person[]
        arrayList.shrink(i);
                 ^
3 errors
share|improve this question
1  
Why is Person an inner class? Why should a Person only be relevant within the context of an FBList? –  Mattias Buelens Feb 10 '13 at 16:39
    
When I did that, I was setting up my interface and I needed references to Person for my methods. –  David Feb 10 '13 at 16:48
    
Why can't you refer to an outside Person class? Interfaces shouldn't be restricted to the scope of one class, surely they can refer to other classes as well? –  Mattias Buelens Feb 10 '13 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since Person is an inner class, its name needs to be qualified with the name of the outer class:

protected void expandInsert(int i, FBList.Person person){
    FBList.Person[] temp = new FBList.Person[arrayList.length * 2];
    ...
    // and so on...
}

EDIT: Removed a suggestion to make class static because the class is nested inside an interface. The suggestion would have been required for classes nested inside classes; for interfaces, static is optional.

share|improve this answer
    
So I tried this, but my compiler output is still like this: FBArrayList.java:56: package FBlist does not exist protected void insertAtEnd(int i, FBlist.Person person){ ^ FBArrayList.java:106: cannot find symbol symbol : method expandInsert(int,FBList.Person) location: class FBList.Person[] arrayList.expandInsert(i, person); ^ FBArrayList.java:108: cannot find symbol symbol : method insertAtEnd(int,FBList.Person) location: class FBList.Person[] arrayList.insertAtEnd(i, person); ^ Sorry for the poor formatting. –  David Feb 10 '13 at 16:56
    
@Dave I think you misspelled FBList (the third L should be upper case). –  dasblinkenlight Feb 10 '13 at 17:06
    
Thanks, I did corrected that, but for some reason I am still getting the same output as above. :/ –  David Feb 10 '13 at 17:13
    
@Dave I tried this on ideone, and your code compiled correctly. When you put your classes in different files, make sure that you declare them in the same package (i.e. the package directive, if any, is the same in all files from your related package, and that the path to the files follows the structure of the name of the package. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 10 '13 at 17:22
    
Ok, I figured it out. I was calling methods on the array itself instead of using this.. It now compiles fine. Thank you! –  David Feb 10 '13 at 17:42

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