Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hello friends i have a problem in a css i want to convert a div tag into inline

<div id="menu1">
 <ul>
 <a href="#"> <li>  one</li> </a>
 <a href="#"> <li>  two</li> </a>
 <a href="#"> <li>  three</li> </a>
 <a href="#"> <li> four </li> </a>
 <a href="#"> <li> five</li> </a>
 <a href="#"> <li>six </li> </a>
 <a href="#"> <li> seven </li> </a>
 <a href="#"> <li> eight </li> </a>
 </ul>
 </div>

<div id="menu2">
<ul>
<a href="#"> <li>  one</li> </a>
<a href="#"> <li>  two</li> </a>
<a href="#"> <li>  three</li> </a>
<a href="#"> <li> four </li> </a>
<a href="#"> <li> five</li> </a>
<a href="#"> <li>six </li> </a>
<a href="#"> <li> seven </li> </a>
<a href="#"> <li> eight </li> </a>
</ul>
</div>

now i want that a menu 1 display on,left side and menu 2 display on right side iam using display inline but it is not working

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

I'd suggest:

div {
    width: 48%;
    float: left;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

Or, if your users have a compliant browser, you can set the width to 50%, using box-sizing to contain the padding and border-width within the defined width of the element:

div {
    width: 50%;
    float: left;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -ms-box-sizing: border-box;
    -o-box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

Similarly, given compliant browsers, you could instead use the column-count property to define a specific number of columns, into which the browser will fit the content. For this to work I've wrapped your current (hideously invalid) html in another element, with an id of 'wrapper':

#wrapper {
    -moz-column-count: 2;
    -ms-column-count: 2;
    -o-column-count: 2;
    -webkit-column-count: 2;
    column-count: 2;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

If you have the option of only requiring Webkit and Opera support, and perhaps your users have enabled flex-box support in their Firefox installation, then using the CSS flex-box model becomes an option, though again requires a wrapping element to contain the two menu elements, with the following CSS:

#wrapper {
    display: -webkit-flex;
    -webkit-flex-direction: row;
    -webkit-flex-wrap: nowrap;
}

#wrapper > div {
    display: -webkit-flex-inline;
    -webkit-flex: 1 1 auto;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

Note: WebKit implementation must be prefixed with -webkit; Gecko implementation is unprefixed but behind a preference (except if you are using Nightly); Internet Explorer implements an old version of the spec, prefixed; Opera 12.10 implements the latest version of the spec, unprefixed.


The invalid mark-up

<div id="menu1">
 <ul>
       <a href="#"> <li>  one</li> </a>
       <a href="#"> <li>  two</li> </a>
       <a href="#"> <li>  three</li> </a>
       <a href="#"> <li> four </li> </a>
       <a href="#"> <li> five</li> </a>
       <a href="#"> <li>six </li> </a>
       <a href="#"> <li> seven </li> </a>
       <a href="#"> <li> eight </li> </a>
    </ul>
</div>

The only valid child element of a ul (or an ol) is an li: no other elements are permitted within a ul or ol unless they're wrapped in an li element. So, to correct your HTML, it should be:

<div id="menu1">
 <ul>
       <li><a href="#">one</a></li>
       <li><a href="#">two</a></li>
       <li><a href="#">three</a></li>
       <li><a href="#">four</a></li>
       <li><a href="#">five</a></li>
       <li><a href="#">six</a></li>
       <li><a href="#">seven</a></li>
       <li><a href="#">eight</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>

If the purpose of wrapping the li with an a was to make the clickable area of the a element fill the li, then simply use a { display: block; }

References:

share|improve this answer
    
but in both ways answer is same either <li> inside <a> or <a> inside <li> please tell me what are the benifits of <a> inside <li> –  user1745334 Feb 11 '13 at 17:41
    
Browsers will attempt to rescue broken/invalid HTML; if you supply valid HTML the browser doesn't (unpredictably) rearrange the mark-up when it's forming the DOM, which means it's easier to work with. The reason not to wrap the li with an a is simply that it is invalid HTML. The question becomes, then, why would you not want to write your HTML properly? –  David Thomas Feb 11 '13 at 17:46
    
good it is very helping for me –  user1745334 Feb 12 '13 at 11:40

Can you try float: left for the 2 <div>s?

See DEMO.

#menu1, #menu2 {
    float:left;
}
share|improve this answer

Using the CSS float attribute you can attain what you are looking for.

#menu1 {
    float: left;
}
#menu2 {
    float: left;
}

You can look at this fiddle as an example.

See Also

share|improve this answer
    
w3fools.com –  Antony Feb 10 '13 at 17:19
    
thanks its now working but not working with display:inline –  user1745334 Feb 11 '13 at 17:42
    
That is correct. This wouldn't work for display:inline. –  blo0p3r Feb 11 '13 at 18:27

I think you should displayed your lists in inline-block (with inline-block you keep the initial width).

#menu1, #menu2 {
   display:inline-block;
}

Olivier

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.