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Using a #define while initializing an array

#include <stdio.h>

#define TEST 1;

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
        int array[] = { TEST };

        printf("%d\n", array[0]);

        return 0;                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
}

compiler complains:

test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:7: error: expected ‘}’ before ‘;’ token
make: *** [test] Error 1

Using a #define as functional input arguments

#include <stdio.h>

#define TEST 1;

void print_arg(int arg)
{
        printf("%d", arg);
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
        print_arg(TEST);
        return 0;                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
} 

compiler complains:

test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:12: error: expected ‘)’ before ‘;’ token
make: *** [test] Error 1

How does one solve these two problems? I thought C simply does a search and replace on the source file, replacing TEST with 1, no?

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closed as too localized by Oli Charlesworth, Rapptz, Mario, SztupY, Ram kiran Feb 11 '13 at 2:30

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4  
Just a typo: You have a semi-colon in your macro definition. –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 10 '13 at 17:31
1  
@chutsu, as a general rule don't put the semicolon in macros. Make the caller add it (if it is needed). This will cause compiler errors to be thrown if they don't add it and it is needed. –  Josh Petitt Feb 10 '13 at 17:51
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem is because there is semicolon in your #define TEST 1;.

With this, the program translates to:

int array[] = { 1; }; /*this is illegal!*/

Remedy: remove it so it looks like:

#define TEST 1

which translates to:

int array[] = {1}; /*legal*/
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THanks to the upvoter, I got 6000+ number of the beast :-) –  Aniket Feb 10 '13 at 17:51
    
no prob, I was scared also :-) –  Josh Petitt Feb 10 '13 at 18:15
    
@JoshPetitt haha :-) Thanks a bunch mate. –  Aniket Feb 10 '13 at 18:15
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Remove ; after define.

#define TEST 1
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