Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Recently I was thinking about some issues I had in the past while attempting to design a particular domain model, lets just say Address, that can be editable with a given context but non-editable within another. My current way of thinking is that I would have both a Value Object version of the Address and an Entity for the Address perhaps attached to something like a customer account in order to derive it's identity.

Now I'm realizing that if I'm ever creating a new Address, such as when one is entered in by the user, that I most likely also need to be able to continue to edit that Address and perhaps edit any preexisting Addresses as well within that same bounded context. For this reason I could assume that within this context Address should be modeled as Entity and not a Value Object. This leads me to my main question which is that if you should always be using entities when modifying an existing set of data or creating a new data then does it ever make sense to have a Factory for creating any Value Object?

The rule that is beginning to emerge for me as I follow this line of thinking is that value objects should only be created to represent things that are either static to the application or things that have already been persisted into the database but not things that are transient within the current domain context. So the only place I should any type of creation of value objects would be when they are re-hydrated/materialized within or on the behalf of aggregate root repositories for persistent values or within a service in the case of static values. This is beginning to seem pretty clear to me however it concerns me that I haven't read anywhere else where somebody is drawing the same conclusions. Either way, I'm hoping that somebody can confirm my conclusions or set me straight.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

that can be editable with a given context but non-editable within another

Differences in mutability settings for an entity within different contexts can also be represented in the application tier. It is an operational concern, possibly involving authentication and authorization and an application service is a convenient location for this logic. The distinction between a VO and an entity does not address these concerns directly. Just because a VO should be immutable, does not mean that an entity cannot change the value of a VO that it references. For instance, a user can reference an immutable address value, however an edit operation can update the user to reference a new value. Allowing a user to edit an address in one context and not in another can be represented as permission values associated with the corresponding context.

This leads me to my main question which is that if you should always be using entities when modifying an existing set of data or creating a new data then does it ever make sense to have a Factory for creating any Value Object?

It can certainly make sense to have a factory for creating VO instances. This can be a static method on the VO class or a dedicated object, depending on your preference. However, a VO should not be used to address mutability requirements of the domain model. Instead, as specified above, this should be handled at the application tier.

share|improve this answer
    
"An edit operation can update the user to reference a new value". This suggestion gets to the core of my question precisely. I used to work off of the same assumption but recently I've begun doubting this and wondering if one of the values of having value objects is never having to guess whether they need to be persisted themselves. In other words, the entities get modified and one way in which they do is when their reference to an object changes. In the case of an entity, that entity may need to be created/modified. A value object reference could instead strictly imply change in relationship. –  jpierson Feb 10 '13 at 20:54
    
I suppose the fact that I'm talking about change in relationship could be evident that I'm really talking about read-only entities or what some people seem to refer to as snapshots and not Value Objects. Thanks for setting me straight! I'll keep the question open for a little bit to give anybody else a chance to chime in before I accept your answer. –  jpierson Feb 10 '13 at 21:00
    
Maybe you're thinking about something like event sourcing? In that case, read only value objects appear as events which explicitly represent state changes on an entity. –  eulerfx Feb 10 '13 at 22:26
    
I'm aware of event sourcing but I'm not using that model yet. My thinking was mainly about whether when creating new values or a set of values that would typically be modeled as a ValueObject does it always make sense to model that case as an Entity for the purpose of modification. I'm grasping here but it seems to me that the decision on this could greatly affect how change detection would have to be done. –  jpierson Feb 18 '13 at 13:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.