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I am trying to grow a list in R, where both the value and name of each entry is held in a variable, but it doesn't seem to work.

my_models_names <- names(my_models)
my_rocs=list() 
for (modl in my_models_names) {

    my_probs <- testPred[[modl]]$Y1
    my_roc <- roc(Ytst, my_probs)
    c(my_rocs, modl=my_roc) # <-- modl and my_roc are both variables
    }

My list my_rocs is empty at the end, even though I know that the loop iterates (my_roc is filled in) Why?

On a related note, is there a way to do this without looping?

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2  
reproducible example please ... ?? tinyurl.com/reproducible-000 ... lapply is the way to do the problem without (explicit) looping –  Ben Bolker Feb 10 '13 at 18:29
    
Thanks @BenBolker. You are right, Sorry for not having provided it, I will put one together, but in the mean time I think I found an answer on another thread. –  user815423426 Feb 10 '13 at 18:40
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3 Answers

Generally in R, growing objects is bad. It increases the amount of memory used over starting with the full object and filling it in. It seems you know what the size of the list should be in advance.

For example:

my_keys <- letters[1:3]
mylist <- vector(mode="list", length=length(my_keys))
names(mylist) <- my_keys

mylist
## $a
## NULL

## $b
## NULL

## $c
## NULL

You can do assignment this way:

key <- "a"
mylist[[key]] <- 5
mylist
## $a
## [1] 5
##
## $b
## NULL
##
## $c
## NULL
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+1. And more important that the memory usage, the constant reallocation of memory makes growing an object very slow for large datasets, up-to several orders of magnitude. –  Paul Hiemstra Feb 11 '13 at 7:40
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I found the answer on this thread.

I can grow a list using the following generic formula:

mylist <- list()

for (key in my_keys){ 
mylist[[ key ]] <- value # value is computed dynamically
}

In my OP:

  • mylist is my_rocs
  • key is modl
  • value is my_roc
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1  
I would really consider not growing the object, this gets really slow when mylist becomes big. See my answer for an example using lapply (which is the R-way to do it), or preallocate your mylist to the correct size. It might not make a difference when mylist is short, but in general this style is slow. –  Paul Hiemstra Feb 11 '13 at 7:46
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You can also use a more R-like soltution, and use lapply:

get_model = function(model_name) {
    my_probs <- testPred[[model_name]]$Y1
    return(roc(Ytst, my_probs))
  }
model_list = lapply(names(my_models), get_model)

Note that this solution saves you a lot of boilerplate code, it also does not suffer from the reallocation problem of your solution by growing the object. For large datasets, this can mean that the lapply solution is thousands of times faster.

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