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I'm currently studying pointers to functions and have been practicing on sort array functions. The point is I input a sequence of numbers into the function and the program will re arrange it in ascending order. It worked just fine when I do a call by value function (I think that's how you call it). However when I try to assign a pointer to function and try to use that pointer instead of the function itself, it returns a bunch of errors. I'm sure the problem is due to the fact that I'm passing an array as an argument to the function POINTER. Here is my code:

#include<stdio.h>
#define SIZE 10

void sort(int a[], int size);
void swap(int *elt1, int *elt2);
main()
{
    int i; int array[SIZE]= {1,9,3,2,4,100,43,23,32,12};
    void (*fptr)(int array, int SIZE);
    fptr = &sort;
    (*fptr)(array,SIZE);
    /*sort(array, SIZE);*/
    for(i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
            printf("%d\n", array[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

void sort(int a[], int size)
{
    int pass, j;
    for(pass = 0; pass<size;pass++)
    {
            for(j=0;j<size;j++)
            {
                    if(a[j]>a[j+1])
                    {
                            swap(&a[j], &a[j+1]);
                    }
            }

    }


}


void swap(int *elt1, int *elt2)
{
    int hold;
    hold = *elt1;
    *elt1 = *elt2;
    *elt2 = hold;

}
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3  
The types of void (*fptr)(int array, int SIZE) don't seem the same of void sort(int a[], int size). –  Jack Feb 10 '13 at 19:30
    
@Jack They may not seem to be the same, but they are. –  user529758 Feb 10 '13 at 19:31
    
@H2CO3 and int and a pointer to int? Actually I pointed out your same issue so I don't see your point. –  Jack Feb 10 '13 at 19:32
    
@Jack Those aren't. –  user529758 Feb 10 '13 at 19:32
    
@H2CO3 help the slow guy (me). When is an int synonymous with an int* (intptr_t not withstanding =P) –  WhozCraig Feb 10 '13 at 19:32

1 Answer 1

The first argument of the function is a pointer to int (that is, int *), and not int.

void (*fptr)(int array, int SIZE);

should be

void (*fptr)(int *array, int SIZE);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 lockstep with what I hoped was right =) –  WhozCraig Feb 10 '13 at 19:34
    
@WhozCraig Thanks ;-) –  user529758 Feb 10 '13 at 19:35
    
+1 just sort to the point ans. –  Arpit Feb 10 '13 at 19:36
    
H2CO3, thanks but its still not working.. Here is what I get: sortpointeragain.c:9: error: expected ‘;’, ‘,’ or ‘)’ before numeric constant sortpointeragain.c:10: error: ‘fptr’ undeclared (first use in this function) sortpointeragain.c:10: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once sortpointeragain.c:10: error: for each function it appears in.) –  user2059456 Feb 10 '13 at 19:43
    
@user2059456: did you notice that your second parameter here: void (*fptr)(int array, int SIZE) has the same name of a #define? What happens is that preprocessor replaces it to void (*fptr)(int array, int 10) which is obviously not correct. Use a different name. –  Jack Feb 10 '13 at 19:48

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