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I'm trying to formulate an SQL FULL OUTER JOIN, which includes all values in table A and table B, but not those values common between them.

I have searched the internet, and stumbled upon the following SQL code:

SELECT * FROM TableA
FULL OUTER JOIN TableB
ON TableA.name = TableB.name
WHERE TableA.id IS null 
OR TableB.id IS null

Which can be illustrated like so:

enter image description here

I'm not sure I understand the IS null parts. Could the SQL be carried out by simply stating something like the following as a WHERE condition? :

WHERE TableA.id <> TableB.id
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What is it you don't understand about the IS NULL clauses?

In an OUTER JOIN (LEFT, RIGHT, FULL) there's a chance that columns from the outer table could end up as NULL.

The clauses

WHERE TableA.id IS null 
OR TableB.id IS null

are simply saying that one of the IDs has to be NULL, I.E. if you have a row from TableA there can't exist a matching row from TableB and vice versa.

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What I'm not understanding is that according to the Venn Diagram, you would want values which are in TableA and TableB, but you would not want values which are common in both. I am not understanding what null has to do with this –  Dot NET Feb 10 '13 at 19:52
    
I see! Say you select one column from TableA and one from TableB. That means your result set is a table with two columns. If you do an INNER JOIN, both columns will be filled, but if you do any kind of OUTER JOIN, what do you put in the columns where a matching record doesn't exist? NULL! The tables in the Wikipedia article should help visualize it for you: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_join#Outer_joins –  Petter Brodin Feb 10 '13 at 19:56
    
Thanks so much for the explanation! :) –  Dot NET Feb 10 '13 at 20:01
SELECT Name, ID FROM TableA UNION SELECT Name, ID FROM TableB 
EXCEPT
SELECT Name, ID FROM TableB INTERSECT SELECT Name, ID FROM TableA 

The first select gets all rows from table A and table B and combines this into 1 result set. The second select selects all rows that are common between the two. What the except does is select all rows from the first select - all rows from the second select.

What you end up with is all rows - the rows that are common between the two tables.

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MySQL does not support the EXCEPToperator. –  a_horse_with_no_name Feb 10 '13 at 20:21

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