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At Java byte code level, is there any difference between an simple if-statement (Example 1) and a normal if-statement (Example 2):

Example 1:

if (cond) statement;

Example 2:

if (cond) {
    statement;
}

The background of the question, is that I saw in "high performance" classes like java.awt.Rectangle and Point only the variant without curly braces.

Is there any speed benefit, or is that only code style?

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Why don't you analyze it yourself? And see what you get. –  Rohit Jain Feb 10 '13 at 20:22
    
I have no experience with byte code –  raceworm Feb 10 '13 at 20:32
    
to the downvoter: some comments would be interesting. –  raceworm Feb 10 '13 at 20:51
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Aparte from the maintainability of your code, in terms of performance is exactly the same. You will not gain speed up from removing {}, since {} it is not an instruction by it self.

I normal use with {} because makes the code easy to read (IMO) and less propitious to making errors.

This example:

public void A(int i) {
     if (i > 10) {
        System.out.println("i");
        }
    }

    public void B(int i) {
        if (i > 10)
            System.out.println("i");
    }

byte code generated:

 // Method descriptor #15 (I)V
  // Stack: 2, Locals: 2
  public void A(int i);
     0  iload_1 [i]
     1  bipush 10
     3  if_icmple 14
     6  getstatic java.lang.System.out : java.io.PrintStream [16]
     9  ldc <String "i"> [22]
    11  invokevirtual java.io.PrintStream.println(java.lang.String) : void [24]
    14  return
      Line numbers:
        [pc: 0, line: 5]
        [pc: 6, line: 6]
        [pc: 14, line: 8]
      Local variable table:
        [pc: 0, pc: 15] local: this index: 0 type: program.TestClass
        [pc: 0, pc: 15] local: i index: 1 type: int
      Stack map table: number of frames 1
        [pc: 14, same]

  // Method descriptor #15 (I)V
  // Stack: 2, Locals: 2
  public void B(int i);
     0  iload_1 [i]
     1  bipush 10
     3  if_icmple 14
     6  getstatic java.lang.System.out : java.io.PrintStream [16]
     9  ldc <String "i"> [22]
    11  invokevirtual java.io.PrintStream.println(java.lang.String) : void [24]
    14  return
      Line numbers:
        [pc: 0, line: 11]
        [pc: 6, line: 12]
        [pc: 14, line: 13]
      Local variable table:
        [pc: 0, pc: 15] local: this index: 0 type: program.TestClass
        [pc: 0, pc: 15] local: i index: 1 type: int
      Stack map table: number of frames 1
        [pc: 14, same]

As you can see the are the same.

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i, too ever used the curly variant. but suns java developper(s) not, even the android.graphics.Rect does use the variant with single statement. –  raceworm Feb 10 '13 at 20:45
1  
@raceworm That's a code convention though, it has nothing to do with performance, since there is no difference to the generated code. –  nos Feb 10 '13 at 20:50
    
perfect. ......, i thought too, that this high number of ifs are in that special case more readable, with single line if –  raceworm Feb 10 '13 at 20:57
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The two are exactly the same. The Java compile will produce the same code.

Keep in mind, however, that in the non-bracket case, you will not be able to add multiple sub-statements inside the if-block the way you would be able to in the bracketed case

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Have you tested it? –  Jan Dvorak Feb 10 '13 at 20:22
3  
There should be no difference. I have not tested in using some bytecode inspection, but if there was a difference, than these two statements would be realized differently in compiler tree API (and there is no difference between these two) –  malejpavouk Feb 10 '13 at 20:34
    
and even if there would be some difference - Java has just in time compiler with HotSpot...i really doubt, if these micromicromicro optimizations might have even measurable effect –  malejpavouk Feb 10 '13 at 20:37
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The two examples you gave do the same exact thing. Your first example is a simple if-then-statement, while your second example is a normal if-then statement.

The time it takes to execute those two statements is the same, since the braces are not an instruction, and therefore do not effect speed. I would still use the normal if statement though, so you can have as many statements as you want within the if-statement.

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I am interested in the extreme small differenece because i need it for thousands of rectangle.inside calls each second on a mobile device –  raceworm Feb 10 '13 at 20:29
    
That's fine, but I would focus on other, larger performance-hogging issues before you focus on such small ones –  syb0rg Feb 10 '13 at 20:30
    
the larger pefrormance hogging is solved, by using a spatial index. –  raceworm Feb 10 '13 at 20:40
    
So remember to use float instead of double, it will raise performance a lot –  Michał Tabor Feb 10 '13 at 20:50
    
@MichałTabor Thanks, of course I use int –  raceworm Feb 10 '13 at 21:09
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