Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm pretty sure this is an easy problem but I am completely blacking out on how to fix this. I am trying to work my way through the PGM class on coursera and it starts of with joint probability distribution. So I am trying to generate a list of all possible distributions given n variables, where each variable can take on some discrete value between 0...z

so for instance say we have 3 variables, and each can take on values of just 0 and 1 I want to generate this:

[[0, 0, 1]
[0, 1, 0]
[1, 0, 0]
[1, 1, 0]
[0, 1, 1]
[1, 1, 1]
[1, 0, 1]
[0, 0, 0]]

I am working in python I am drawing a blank on how to dynamically generate this.

share|improve this question
2  
Looks like you need itertools.product. – Lev Levitsky Feb 10 '13 at 22:07

If you prefer list comprehension:

[[a, b, c] for a in range(2) for b in range(2) for c in range(2)]

And I forgot to mention that you can use pprint to get the effect you want:

>>> import pprint  
>>> pprint.pprint([[a, b, c] for a in range(2) for b in range(2) for c in range(2)])  
[[0, 0, 0],  
 [0, 0, 1],  
 [0, 1, 0],  
 [0, 1, 1],  
 [1, 0, 0],  
 [1, 0, 1],  
 [1, 1, 0],  
 [1, 1, 1]]  
>>>   
share|improve this answer

It sounds like you want the Cartesian product:

from itertools import product
for x in product([0,1], [0,1], [0,1]):
    print x

[0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 1]
[0, 1, 0]
[0, 1, 1]
[1, 0, 0]
[1, 0, 1]
[1, 1, 0]
[1, 1, 1]

share|improve this answer
1  
No need to create 3 identical lists, product has the keyword argument repeat for this. – Lev Levitsky Feb 10 '13 at 22:36
    
Good point @Lev. I wasn't sure if all the variables in the question would take on the exact same values (seems like [0,1] was just a simplified example) so I listed them out in my response. if they do all have the same domain, follow Lev's suggestion and DRY. – Nathan Jhaveri Feb 11 '13 at 7:46

Slight improvement over Nathan's method:

>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.product([0, 1], repeat=3))
[(0, 0, 0),
 (0, 0, 1),
 (0, 1, 0),
 (0, 1, 1),
 (1, 0, 0),
 (1, 0, 1),
 (1, 1, 0),
 (1, 1, 1)]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.