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I am trying to learn standard ml of new jersey, but I don't understand how to iterate though lists.

I am trying to create a function that takes a value and a list of functions, and returns another list of strings, if the current function returns true when given the value.

A function is like this ('a -> bool) * string, i.e. a pair of the function and a string of its name.

The function is a curried function so its defined like "fun itr x xs".

I want to do this non-recursively.

Can anyone help me start?

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Why do you want to do it non-recursively? ML's list structures are naturally recursive. –  voithos Feb 10 '13 at 23:21
    
I am pretty sure that there is no such thing as "non-recursive" in SML. There are no loop control flow structures. As stated below, you could use foldr, but that is just a higher-order function that uses recursion. –  dbmikus Jun 14 '13 at 14:25
1  
You can write imperative code in Standard ML, but it's not pretty. There are both while and ref, so e.g. val x = ref 0; val _ = while !x < 10 do x := !x + 1. –  Simon Shine Aug 6 '13 at 11:27
    
@SimonShine: True, though the Definition defines while ... do ... as a "derived form" of let val rec vid = fn () => if ... then (...; vid()) else () in vid() end -- i.e., declaring a tail-recursive function vid and then calling it -- so it's arguably still recursive. –  ruakh yesterday

2 Answers 2

A natural and straightforward function for this could be written fairly easily with recursion.

fun itr x fs =
  case fs
    of [] => []
     | (f, s) :: fs' => if f x
                        then s :: itr x fs'
                        else itr x fs'

Or, if you don't want to explicitly recurse in your function, you could use foldr.

fun itr x fs =
  List.foldr (fn ((f, s), ss) =>
    if f x
    then s :: ss
    else ss) [] fs

Also, itr isn't a very informative name, so you may want to choose a different one that better describes what it is you are trying to do.

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So, if I understand correctly, you want to be able to call your function like this:

itr
    3
    [ ((fn i => i > 3), "greaterThanThree"),
      ((fn i => i mod 2 = 1), "odd"),
      ((fn i => 12 mod i = 0), "dividesTwelve")
    ]

and get a result like ["odd", "dividesTwelve"] (since odd and dividesTwelve are the two functions that return true when applied to 3).

Do I have that right?

So, we can start by writing:

(* Given a value and a list of named Boolean functions, returns a list of the names of the
 * functions that return true for value.
 *)
fun itr value namedFunctions =
  ...

Since you say that you want to "do this non-recursively", I assume that what you mean is that you want to use the list functions in the Standard ML Basis Library that let you process lists by providing functions that handle list-elements in isolation; those functions are implemented using recursion, of course, but if itr just delegates to them, then itr itself need not be recursive.

Given those requirements, I see two approaches.


One approach is to start by using List.filter (see List.filter documentation here) to get just the elements of namedFunctions that return true when called on value. To do this, we need a function that takes a named function (a ('a -> bool) * string, where 'a is the type of value) and returns true if the named function returns true; that is:

(* A function that, given a named Boolean function, returns whether it returns true for
 * value.
 *)
fn (f, _) => f value

That lets us call List.filter like so:

(* A list of the elements of namedFunctions that return true for value. *)
List.filter (fn (f, _) => f value) namedFunctions

Once we have that, we need to use List.map (see List.map documentation here) to get just the name of each function:

(* A list of the names in namedFunctions that return true for value. *)
List.map #2 (List.filter (fn (f, _) => f value) namedFunctions)

(where #2 is the function to extract component 2 of a tuple or record; in the case of a named function, #2 namedFunction is the name).

Putting it together:

(* Given a value and a list of named Boolean functions, returns a list of the names of the
 * functions that return true for value.
 *)
fun itr value namedFunctions =
  List.map #2 (List.filter (fn (f, _) => f value) namedFunctions)

Another approach is to combine both the filtering and the mapping into a single step, by using List.mapPartial (see List.mapPartial documentation here). Instead of first selecting just the elements we want by using a function that takes a named function and returns a Boolean, and then converting them to the form we want by using a function that takes a named function and returns its name, we can combine the steps by using a function that takes a named function and returns its name only if we want it.

In Standard ML, when we want to represent a value that doesn't always exist, we use option; for example, string option means "either a string, or nothing" (see Option.option documentation here; note that, although it's documented as Option.option, it's also available as just option). So, here's a function that takes a named function and returns its name only if it returns true for value:

(* A function that, given a named Boolean function, returns its name if it returns true
 * for value, and nothing if it returns false.
 *)
fn (f, name) => if f value then SOME name else NONE

Such a function is called a "partial function" — it returns a value for only part of its domain — and we can use List.mapPartial to retrieve its results for only those cases where it returns one:

(* Given a value and a list of named Boolean functions, returns a list of the names of the
 * functions that return true for value.
 *)
fun itr value namedFunctions =
  List.mapPartial (fn (f, name) => if f value then SOME name else NONE) namedFunctions

In general, any time that you want to apply List.map to the result of List.filter or vice versa, you can combine both steps by using List.mapPartial. (In any given instance, however, it may or may not be a good idea to do so. I recommend whichever one is clearer.)

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