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Suppose I have some code calling a method like vector::length() several times...does creating a temporary variable like

int length=myVector.length()

make it more efficient than calling the method several times?

This is a somewhat hypothetical question, so let's assume calling vector::length() is the only way to get our desired result.

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closed as not a real question by Luchian Grigore, Jesse Good, juanchopanza, William Pursell, Sudarshan Feb 11 '13 at 5:13

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Did you... ummm... try measuring it yourself? –  Luchian Grigore Feb 10 '13 at 22:56
4  
There is no answer to this, it might get optimized away, it might not. –  Jesse Good Feb 10 '13 at 22:57
4  
well, what if myVector.length() changes? Do you want to trace the changes or not? –  juanchopanza Feb 10 '13 at 22:59
    
Sorry everyone, I thought this would be a valid question. –  abckookooman Feb 16 '13 at 19:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The cost of storing a value in a local variable is next to nothing. The cost of calling an inlined "fetch this member variable" is also next to nothing.

If, on the other hand, the object is not a vector, and length is not held in a member variable, but has to be counted - say like strlen(), then there is a great benefit of storing it in a local variable. Particularly if the string is more than a few characters long.

The other problem is of course that you do something like:

int number_of_widgets = my_widgets.length();
...   // more code here, but none that affect my_widgets. 

last_widget = my_widgets[number_of_widgets-1]; 
... 

And then someone else goes and edits the cdoe:

int number_of_widgets = my_widgets.length();
... some code.
my_widgets.erase(some_widget_iterator);

...   // more code here

last_widget = my_widgets[number_of_widgets-1]; 
... 

Now your code is accessing outside the valid range and may crash and burn...

As always, the devil is in the detail. If you want to know what's fastest IN YOUR CODE, then benchmark it using your code...

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I've rephrased it to explain that the length of something that isn't a vector may not be trivial to calculate. My point is that if you make it a rule to never store length, because you believe it can be trivially fetched, then you may also run into problems with some of the things that DO take some effort counting/calculating/etc. –  Mats Petersson Feb 10 '13 at 23:09
    
Just a note on your sentence, "The cost of storing a value in a local variable is next to nothing."... it all depends on the situation. If the compiler is forced to spill the variable onto the stack, accessing it is slower than if it were in a register. This is more likely when you're working with sizes/indices rather than with pointers/iterators, because those require extra work to get the required address. I've experienced this problem first-hand when creating my own lexer and parser, where using iterators & avoiding register spilling onto the stack gave me a non-negligible speed boost. –  Mehrdad Feb 10 '13 at 23:15
1  
Yes, like I said, the devil is in the detail, and benchmark! ;) –  Mats Petersson Feb 10 '13 at 23:17

In this case you don't need to worry about speed, it's fast to call length() directly. For readability, unless you really call it lots of lots of times, I'd say - call it directly. If it does make the code ugy, e.g called 10 times on 10 rows, then you can cache it in a variable to make the code look better.

Rule number 1 of optimization: don't optimize. It's fast anyway. I don't think vector::length() could slow down your program, but anyway, as long as you don't have speed problems, there's no good reason to try optimizing it manually. A smart compiler should decide and optimize it if relevant.

On IDEs you have code completion so it's not even an issue of typing more, just visual readability of the code (again, unless this specific function is slowing down the program, which I doubt).

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The only way to tell for sure is to profile your code.

Personally, if I knew the vector was not going to change in the current scope, I would optimise for readability initially and make any adjustments based on profiling if required:

const int number_of_widgets = myVector.size();

"We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil" --Donald Knuth

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The real answer is that you should be using iterators if you can, because they're generally faster, and they avoid this problem entirely (assuming the vector doesn't reallocate).

The answer you're probably looking for is: it is usually optimized away in simple cases, but not always.

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2  
If you use iterators, then the question does not go away. It just becomes "do you keep calling myVector.end()?" instead. –  Pete Kirkham Feb 10 '13 at 23:06
    
@PeteKirkham: Great point... but I think, usually, end() returns a copy of a constant value (either a field, or NULL, or something to that effect) -- so that "evaluating" it just amounts to loading a constant field, which is the best you can do anyways. On the other hand, size is more likely to be implemented as returning distance(begin(), end()), which is much less likely to be optimized away. But obviously this all depends on the implementation. –  Mehrdad Feb 10 '13 at 23:10
    
I bet length() on a vector is pretty trivial too - either the class contains a length, or it's the result of subtracting two member variables - which can hopefully be inlined by the compiler, so it becomes one or two instructions. –  Mats Petersson Feb 10 '13 at 23:16
    
@MatsPetersson: It's trivial, but subtracting two pointers consists of 2 loads (probably from [stack] memory) and 1 subtraction, whereas reading a single pointer is just 1 load. That requires occupying an extra register at least, which is not quite negligible since there aren't that many registers. And if the compiler doesn't perform loop-invariant code motion here, then you're doing that on every single iteration, which is obviously slower. Of course, none of this is measurable unless you're in a tight loop, but that's when you really care about it anyway. –  Mehrdad Feb 10 '13 at 23:21

I would assume that they would both be compiled to the same code. However assuming is no good so I tried a test program. I first compiled:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    int myints[] = {16,2,77,29};
    std::vector<int> myVector (myints, myints + sizeof(myints) / sizeof(int) );
    int length=myVector.size();
    std::cout << length << std::endl;
    std::cout << length*3 << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

This correctly gives the output of 4 and 12. Then I tried this program where I do not use the variable "length".

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    int myints[] = {16,2,77,29};
    std::vector<int> myVector (myints, myints + sizeof(myints) / sizeof(int) );
    std::cout << myVector.size() << std::endl;
    std::cout << myVector.size()*3 << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

This program also gave the output correctly of 4 and 12 and did the exact same thing but without the variable length in between. I can state that with the compile flag -O3 or -O2 they give the exact same binary code. This was done with the gcc compiler. So neither way is faster and they both use the same amount of memory.

So just use whichever looks best and is easiest to read.

Although I'm not sure we can generalize completely from my test as it is possible other optimizations were at play. For example it is possible that myVector.size() was calculated at compile time to be 4 at this point could therefore have been hardcoded in to the file rather than being worked out at runtime. Which would make my test rather meaningless.

Hope this helps. (Although I can see 4 other answers were written while I wrote this) so someone else has probably already done a better job of testing this.

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