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I can imagine this has been asked a few times but I literally cannot find an example of a solution to the specific problem I'm trying to figure out.

So I have an object, like so:

var collection = [{ id: 0 }, { id: 1 }, { id: 2 }];

I then have an array, which is the 'order', like so:

var order = [2, 0, 1];

I want to use the 'order' array to reorder the collection in that specific order. I've been trying quite a few solutions with the .sort function, but I can't find one that fits. Can anyone enlighten me? Probably simple, I'm hoping.

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Not sure what your needs are but in such a simple case you could order by index. –  elclanrs Feb 10 '13 at 23:42
    
Be wary of solutions that use multiple, uncached calls to indexOf, since they will involve sweeping through order many, many times. –  Dancrumb Feb 10 '13 at 23:46
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use the sort() method to accomplish this using indexOf:

collection.sort(function(a, b){
    return order.indexOf(a.id) > order.indexOf(b.id);
});
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Worked well, thanks! –  Matthew Ruddy Feb 15 '13 at 23:27
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You can use indexOf function on the order array in the custom sort function, like this:

collection.sort(function(x, y) {
                     return order.indexOf(x.id) > order.indexOf(y.id);
                });
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Seems like I need to type faster, @ozk is faster than me :(. –  Styxxy Feb 10 '13 at 23:44
1  
StackOverflow is all about typing agility :) –  ozk Feb 10 '13 at 23:47
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seems to be as easy as that:

var collection = [{ id: 0 }, { id: 1 }, { id: 2 }];
var order = [2, 0, 1];
var sorted = [];
for(var i=0,c=order.length;i<c;i++){
    sorted.push(collection[order[i]]);
}
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1  
I don't think that does what the OP is asking for. That takes collection and uses order to say "list the third, then the first, then the second from collection". I think that OP wants "list id:2, then id:0, then id:1" –  Dancrumb Feb 10 '13 at 23:39
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Try that:

var collection = [{ id: 0 }, { id: 1 }, { id: 2 }];
var order = [2, 0, 1];
var sortedCollection = [];
for ( var i = 0; i < order.length; i++ ) 
  sortedCollection.push(collection[order[i]]);
console.log(sortedCollection);
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The thing you want to avoid here is scanning through either of these arrays more than you have to.

Here's one solution that avoids this:

/*
 * Map the indexes of the objects in collection to their final location
 */
var sortIndex = {};
order.forEach(function(value, index) {
  sortIndex[value] = index;
});

/*
 * Put the objects in collection into their new, sorted collection
 */
var sortedCollection = [];
collection.forEach(function(value) {
  var sortedLocation = sortIndex[value.id];
   sortedCollection[sortedLocation] = value;

});

Thus, we have a single scan through each of the arrays, keeping the work down to a minimum.

I've used forEach here as a convenience; you could use a library like Lodash or Underscore, or rewrite this to use explicit iteration over the arrays.

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