Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I reliably static_assert on anything that isn't a string literal?

For example, in the following code, I've attempted to wrap the standard assert macro but statically reject anything for the message that's not a string literal (since anything but a string literal will not be displayed at runtime when the assert triggers).

#include <cassert>
#include <string>
#include <type_traits>

#define my_assert(test, message)\
    static_assert(\
        (\
            !std::is_pointer<decltype(message)>::value &&\
            !std::is_array<decltype(message)>::value\
        ),\
        "literal string required"\
    );\
    assert((message, (test)));

int main() {
    my_assert(1 == 1, "one equals one");
    my_assert(1 == 2, "one equals two");

    {
        const char *msg = "one equals one";
        //my_assert(1 == 1, msg); // triggers static_assert
    }

    {
        const char msg[] = "one equals one";
        //my_assert(1 == 1, msg); // triggers static_assert
    }

    {
        const std::string msg = "one equals one";
        //my_assert(1 == 1, msg.c_str()); // triggers static_assert
    }

    {
        const int msg = 3;
        my_assert(1 == 1, msg); // should trigger static_assert
    }
}

As you can see, the testing is done via the tests provided by the type_traits header, and, mostly, this code works as intended (tested with gcc 4.7.2). However, it doesn't specifically look for string literals as much as it just rejects common things that a programmer might use in place.

The solution I have may be good enough for the example above, but I'd like to use this, or a similar technique in other situations as well.

So the question is, how do I reliably use type_traits (or another standard mechanism) to static_assert on anything except a string literal?

share|improve this question
    
Do you actually want to display a message when an assert fails? If so then please post another question. The standard assert() macro is pretty useless in my opinion but there are really neat ways to write your own, displaying a message together with the values of the variables involved. –  Ali Feb 11 '13 at 9:34
    
@Ali thanks, but my question has very little to do with assert() other than that it was a motivating vehicle to demonstrate one reason the answer to the question could be useful. I alreay get a great message when the assert fails using the standard one provided by gcc/libc. There are of course more sophisticated ways to do assertions, but that's not really the point of my question -- as I said, I'm interested in how to detect a string literal vs other things. (My own answer below seems to do the trick pretty closely.) –  wjl Feb 12 '13 at 2:18
    
OK, I though you needed a fancy assert. Well, good luck! –  Ali Feb 12 '13 at 9:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is the best I could get, which appears to reject anything I throw at it, but still accepts literal strings:

#define my_assert(test, message)\
    static_assert(\
        (\
             std::is_convertible      <decltype(message), const char *>::value &&\
            !std::is_rvalue_reference <decltype(message)>::value &&\
            !std::is_pointer          <decltype(message)>::value &&\
            !std::is_array            <decltype(message)>::value &&\
            !std::is_class            <decltype(message)>::value\
        ),\
        "string literal required"\
    );\
    assert((message, (test)))

I'd be very interested to know if this actually is exhaustively correct, and/or if there is a simpler way to do this detection.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.