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I am attempting to have this program read out the dates 1/1 through 12/31 consecutively each on an individual line. So far I have succeeded in printing 1/1 through 1/31, but I am lost as to how to continue my loop so that it will include the rest of the months/days. I know there is an easier way to do this using the calendar, but I am avoiding that route.

public class LoopDate {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int startingDayOfWeek = 2;

    boolean isLeapYear = false;

    int month = 1;
    int year = 2000;
    int numDays = 0;
    switch (month) {
    case 1:
    case 3:
    case 5:
    case 7:
    case 8:
    case 10:
    case 12:
        numDays = 31;
        break;
    case 4:
    case 6:
    case 9:
    case 11:
        numDays = 30;
        break;
    case 2:
        if (((year % 4 == 0) && !(year % 100 == 0)) || (year % 400 == 0))
            numDays = 29;
        else
            numDays = 28;
        break;
    default:
        System.out.println("Invalid month.");
        break;
    }
    int start = 1;

    do {
        System.out.println(month + "/" + start);
        start++;
    } while (start <= numDays);

}

}
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to take the switch statement and put it in the loop - or even better put it in a separate method which you call from the loop.

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Add an enclosing loop.

public class LoopDate {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int startingDayOfWeek = 2;

    boolean isLeapYear = false;
    int year = 2000;
    int numDays = 0;
    for(int month = 1; month <= 12;month++){
        switch (month) {
        case 1:
        case 3:
        case 5:
        case 7:
        case 8:
        case 10:
        case 12:
            numDays = 31;
            break;
        case 4:
        case 6:
        case 9:
        case 11:
            numDays = 30;
            break;
        case 2:
            if (((year % 4 == 0) && !(year % 100 == 0)) || (year % 400 == 0))
                numDays = 29;
            else numDays = 28;
            break;
        default:
            System.out.println("Invalid month.");
            break;
        }
        for(int start=1;start<=numDays;start++) System.out.println(month + "/" + start);

    }
}
}
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Thanks, that worked exactly as I had planned. Would you also know how to seclude certain dates from these print outs. Such as, if I wanted to exclude certain days of the year? AKA: 1/1 1/2 1/4 1/5..etc –  user2057847 Feb 11 '13 at 3:48
    
Add a if(month==someNumber && start==someDay) continue; to the last for loop (You will need to open and close braces so you don't lose the println call). If you're looking to exclude multiple days, use an array with this. –  Montycarlo Feb 11 '13 at 3:53
    
I am trying to exclude all "Friday the 13th" dates from the list no matter what year is entered into the year variable. That is why I have the "startingDayOfWeek" variable to track the fridays based on the first day of the year that is hard-coded in. I am trying to track the friday and the start so if they end up on a friday and a 13 it will skip the print. Would that be possible? –  user2057847 Feb 11 '13 at 3:59
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Here is a general approach to using a two-part condition in a single loop: make the exit condition that require both variables to reach their destination; advance the "fast" variable (in your case, that would be day) once per loop. When the fast variable reaches its limit (28, 29, 30, or 31, depending on the month) you advance the "slow" variable.

Here is pseudocode:

int month = 1;
int day = 1;
while (true) {
    print (month / day);
    day++;
    if (day == lastDayOfTheMonth(month)+1) {
        day = 1;
        month++;
        if (month == 13) break;
    }
}

Note that the switch statement is irrelevant: all you need is a way to tell how many days are in a month based on the month's number (the lastDayOfTheMonth function in the pseudocode above). You can use an array for it, like this:

int[] lastDayOfTheMonth = new int[] {
    0, 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31
};

There is an initial zero because months are numbered from 1. You need to do something special about the 28 if you are to support leap years. With this little array in hand, you can avoid the switch statement altogether.

Here is a demo of this approach on ideone.

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