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In Matlab I can generate such an array

a = [1, 3, 9:100, 201, 202];

which 9:100 will give me 9,10,...,100, so I don't have to type in one by one. Is there an equivalent way of doing so in numpy?

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@bmu, you're right, that's exactly the same question I have. I searched but I didn't find that question. How can I delete my post? –  LWZ Feb 11 '13 at 7:04
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marked as duplicate by bmu, Shai, Yan Sklyarenko, Lukas Knuth, Daniel Kelley Feb 11 '13 at 12:42

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes.

In [3]: numpy.r_[1,3,9:100,201,202]
Out[3]: array([  1,   3,   9,  10, 11,  12,  13,  14,  15,  16,  17,  18,  19,
                20,  21,  22,  23,  24,  25,  26,  27,  28,  29,  30,  31,  32,
                33,  34,  35,  36,  37,  38,  39,  40,  41,  42,  43,  44,  45,
                46,  47,  48,  49,  50,  51,  52,  53,  54,  55,  56,  57,  58,
                59,  60,  61,  62,  63,  64,  65,  66,  67,  68,  69,  70,  71,
                72,  73,  74,  75,  76,  77,  78,  79,  80,  81,  82,  83,  84,
                85,  86,  87,  88,  89,  90,  91,  92,  93,  94,  95,  96,  97,
                98,  99, 201, 202])

Note that slices are right-exclusive in numpy, so 9:100 includes 9, but not 100. Use 9:101 if you want 100 included.

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You are awesome. r_ seems to be a bit strange choice of name for the function though. –  LWZ Feb 11 '13 at 2:46
    
I agree that r_ is an odd name for a singleton object. Someone had to point it out to me too. Here are the docs in case you want to learn more: docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.r_.html –  Mr Fooz Feb 11 '13 at 16:32
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