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Trying to implement a function to return the two's complement of a string of bits. I've tried two varieties and get odd results.

Version 1 (does the inversion but not the "+1"): string twosComp(signed int number) {

string twosComp(signed int number) {

     if ( number == 0 ) { return "1"; }
     if ( number == 1 ) { return "0"; }

     if ( number % 2 == 0 ) {
         return twosComp(number / 2) + "1";
     }
     else {
         return twosComp(number / 2) + "0";
     }
}

Version 2 (inverts and attempts "+1" but doesn't always get it right)

string twosComp(signed int number) {

    bool bit = 0;
    int size = 3; // not sure what to do about this, value could be -32768 to 32767
    string twos;
    number = ~abs(number) + 1;

    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++) {

        //Get right-most bit
        bit = number & 1;
        if(bit) {
            twos += '1';
        }
        else {
            twos += '0';
        }

        //Shift all bits right one place
        number >>= 1;
    }

    return twos;
} // end twosComp

I've been trying various iterations of both of these functions. I'm running out of steam on this. If anyone has a better option -- I'm VERY open to suggestions at this point.

share|improve this question
    
It's really not clear what your question is. –  David Schwartz Feb 11 '13 at 3:31
1  
If that's it, the answer is: ~x+1 –  David Schwartz Feb 11 '13 at 3:33
    
I need to return the bit string. –  frankV Feb 11 '13 at 3:34
1  
So convert it to a string. –  David Schwartz Feb 11 '13 at 3:35
1  
See my answer for doing both these things... –  Floris Feb 11 '13 at 4:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

how about (abs(number) ^ 0xffffffff) + 1, and then turning that value into a string?

edit: also, why is size = 3? ints are 32 bits, usually

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not really sure what it's for. It was in the example. I found it useless. –  frankV Feb 11 '13 at 3:35
    
@frankV it makes the function only return the last 3 bits of the 2s complement of the given number. the range you give is 16 bits –  calccrypto Feb 11 '13 at 3:36
    
if I give a different range it messes up the conversion. I tried "sizing" the string of the binary number produced by abs(number); but that gave me undesired results. –  frankV Feb 11 '13 at 3:39
    
@frankV err..what? –  calccrypto Feb 11 '13 at 3:41
    
according to the example I tried to work off of, size was supposed to be the size of the converted bit string. –  frankV Feb 11 '13 at 3:46

The following code does what you want for a short (16 bit) int: note - I wrote this in C not C++...

char* twosComplement(signed int n) {
    static char s[17];  // static so the variable persists after the call
    unsigned int i;
    int j;
    i = (2<<16)-n; // definition of twos complement

    for(j=0;j<16;j++){
        s[15-j] = ((i&1)==0)?'0':'1'; // test lowest bit
        printf("%c", s[15-j]);        // print for confirmation
        i=i>>1;                       // right shift by one
    }
    printf("\n"); // just to make output look clean
    s[16]='\0';   // terminate the string
    return s;
}

int main() {
printf("the string is %s\n", twosComplement(15)); // just an example
}
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