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I modified the code for the count-change function in SICP so that it would display a pair whenever the function recurses. The pair is of the form "(cc a k)" -> "(cc a (- k 1))" or "(cc a k)" -> "(cc (- a (d k)) k)", my goal is to build up a DOT file to display the tree-recursion using GraphViz.

Here's an example image, generated from the code below: enter image description here

Here's the scheme code:

    ; Count Change

    (define (count-change amount)
      (cc amount 5))

    (define (cc amount kinds-of-coins)
      (begin
        (cond ((= amount 0) 1)
          ((or (< amount 0) (= kinds-of-coins 0)) 0)
          (else (+ 
             (begin 
               (display "\"")
               (display `(cc ,amount ,kinds-of-coins))
               (display "\"")
               (display " -> ")
               (display "\"")
               (display `(cc ,amount ,(- kinds-of-coins 1)))
               (display "\"")
               (display "\n")
               (cc amount (- kinds-of-coins 1))
               )
             (begin 
               (display "\"")
               (display `(cc ,amount ,kinds-of-coins))
               (display "\"")
               (display " -> ")
               (display "\"")
               (display `(cc ,(- amount (first-denomination kinds-of-coins)) ,kinds-of-coins))
               (display "\"")
               (display "\n")
               (cc (- amount (first-denomination kinds-of-coins)) kinds-of-coins)
               )
             )
            ))))

                        ; first-denomination takes the number of kinds of coins and returns the denomination of the first kind
      (define (first-denomination kinds-of-coins)
        (cond ((= kinds-of-coins 1) 1)
          ((= kinds-of-coins 2) 5)
          ((= kinds-of-coins 3) 10)
          ((= kinds-of-coins 4) 25)
          ((= kinds-of-coins 5) 50)))

    (count-change 11)

The original code is here.

I have read about scheme macros, and I think that they could solve this problem by allowing me to 'wrap' calls to (cc . .) in a begin statement with displays to output what is happening at the time of recursion.

How can this be done with Scheme macros?

NOTE: I know that my image is inaccurate, I need to find a way of making the nodes distinct, so that the graph is a tree, and not just a DAG. However, that is outside the scope of this question.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Macros aren't what you want here. The more appropriate tool for this job is a simple local function that knows both the old and new arguments to cc and handles printing out the graphviz text and making the recursive call:

(define (cc amount kinds-of-coins)
  (let ((recur (lambda (new-amount new-kinds)
                 (begin
                   (display "\"")
                   (display `(cc ,amount ,kinds-of-coins))
                   (display "\"")
                   (display " -> ")
                   (display "\"")
                   (display `(cc ,new-amount ,new-kinds))
                   (display "\"")
                   (display "\n")
                   (cc new-amount new-kinds)))))
    (cond ((= amount 0) 1)
          ((or (< amount 0) (= kinds-of-coins 0)) 0)
          (else (+ 
                 (recur amount (- kinds-of-coins 1))
                 (recur (- amount (first-denomination kinds-of-coins)) kinds-of-coins))))))

You didn't say what Scheme implementation you're using, but for some implementations there are some minor syntactic cleanups that can be done as well to make this code look nicer.

share|improve this answer
    
For implementation, I'm using MIT/GNU Scheme. This is a bit nicer than what I have, I like that the printing is in it's own function. Actually, this can be generalized so that cc is a general function, that way I can re-use it on other functions! –  Tobi Lehman Feb 11 '13 at 5:49
    
I didn't use a local function, but I did something similar to what you were suggesting here. I am working on making it independent of the arity of the function. –  Tobi Lehman Feb 11 '13 at 6:16
    
I got around this problem by using labels for the node that encode their location, so rrllr goes right, right, left, left and then right. Details and pictures here –  Tobi Lehman May 15 '13 at 3:08

Here's an approach to abstract the pattern that jacobm suggests:

;; Add graphviz tracing to a definition:
(define-syntax define/graphviz-trace
  (syntax-rules ()
    [(_ (id args ...) body ...)
     (define (id args ...)
       (let* ([real-id id]
              [old-args (list args ...)]
              [id (lambda (args ...)
                    (define new-args (list args ...))
                    (print-trace 'id old-args new-args)
                    (real-id args ...))])
         body ...))]))

;; print-trace: symbol list list -> void
(define (print-trace id old-args new-args)
  (display "\"")
  (display `(id ,@old-args))
  (display "\"")
  (display " -> ")
  (display "\"")
  (display `(id ,@new-args))
  (display "\"")
  (display "\n"))

; first-denomination takes the number of kinds of coins and
; returns the denomination of the first kind
(define (first-denomination kinds-of-coins)
  (cond ((= kinds-of-coins 1) 1)
        ((= kinds-of-coins 2) 5)
        ((= kinds-of-coins 3) 10)
        ((= kinds-of-coins 4) 25)
        ((= kinds-of-coins 5) 50)))

;; Example:
(define/graphviz-trace (cc amount kinds-of-coins)
  (cond ((= amount 0) 1)
        ((or (< amount 0) (= kinds-of-coins 0)) 0)
        (else (+ (cc amount (- kinds-of-coins 1))
                 (cc (- amount (first-denomination kinds-of-coins))
                     kinds-of-coins)))))
share|improve this answer
    
I think I like your solution, although I still am not fluent enough with Scheme to really understand it. For your WeScheme project, I would love to see it integrated with project euler, so that you could code in the website using scheme. –  Tobi Lehman Feb 13 '13 at 1:33

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