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I have a sample table as follows.

ID     Name            Code     Address
----+---------------+--------+----------------
1   |  Sydney Hall  |  SH    |  11 Abc Street
2   |  Sydney Hall  |  SH    |  23 Abc Street
3   |  Main Hall    |  MH    |  74 Xyz Street
4   |  Odyssey Hall |  OH    |  133 AbZ Street
5   |  Odyssey Hall |  OH    |  28 Xyx Street

I would like to select distinct Code entries as well as ID and Name for these distinct entries. For the table above I would like to get the following (so I am ignoring the building addresses).

ID     Name            Code   
----+---------------+--------+
1   |  Sydney Hall  |  SH
3   |  Main Hall    |  MH
4   |  Odyssey Hall |  OH

It's probably a Left Join but I can't seem to put it together properly (especially since I'm selecting data from the same table). Does any one have an idea about this? Thanks.

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why you are not using distinct name, code then have inner join to same table –  Rahul Vasantrao Kamble Feb 11 '13 at 4:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT * FROM [table_1] WHERE  [ID] IN (SELECT MIn([ID]) FROM [table_1] GROUP BY 
CoDE)
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1  
The full code is SELECT id, name, code FROM buildings WHERE id IN (SELECT MIN(id) FROM tb_buildings GROUP BY Code) –  user2014963 Feb 11 '13 at 5:03

I see everyone has already answered this, but why so complicated?

SELECT 
MIN(ID) ID, 
MIN(NAME) NAME, 
CODE 
FROM TABLE 
GROUP BY CODE
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Very good one too! –  user2014963 Feb 11 '13 at 5:27
    
This may show data that doesn't necessarily exist in the original data set, e.g. if MIN(ID) = 1 and MIN(NAME) shows data from row where ID = 2. –  Mike Meyers Feb 12 '13 at 10:04
    
Based on the sample dataset it's fine. Based on real data, yes it's probably insufficient. –  Nick.McDermaid Feb 12 '13 at 11:14

There are two ways that I would look at doing this. One is to use the FIRST aggregate function (documented here). The syntax is a little confusing but it should do the job

Select
  MIN(ID) keep (dense_rank first order by id) as id,
  MIN(NAME) keep (dense_rank first order by id) as name,
  CODE
FROM YOUR_TABLE
GROUP BY CODE

The other alternative method that I would suggest is using the ROW_NUMBER function as suggested by @techdo, although I think you would need to remove the NAME column from that answer and instead use:

SELECT * FROM(
  SELECT 
      ROW_NUMBER() over (partition by CODE order by ID) RNUM, 
      ID, 
      NAME, 
      CODE
    FROM YOUR_TABLE
  )x where RNUM=1;
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Great post. Thanks, Mike! –  user2014963 Feb 11 '13 at 5:25

Please try:

SELECT * FROM(
  SELECT 
      ROW_NUMBER() over (partition by NAME, CODE order by NAME, CODE) RNUM, 
      ID, 
      NAME, 
      CODE, 
      ADDRESS 
    FROM YourTABLE
  )x where RNUM=1;
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This also works. Very good answer. –  user2014963 Feb 11 '13 at 5:05

You can use this one also:

SELECT ID,Name,Code  FROM table WHERE ID IN (SELECT Max(ID) FROM table GROUP BY 
Code)
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