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I am experimenting with preprocessor function-like macros so I am trying to write a macro that forward declares regular functions. But when I go to compile it says that line 2 has incorrect syntax.

What am I doing wrong?

#define FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(fName) "int" #fName "(int id, string msg, string cmd);"
FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT("abc") // LINE 2: Should become "int abc(int id, string msg, string cmd);"

void test()
{
    abc(1, "", "");
}
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Why should it become "int ... " and not int ...? – chris Feb 11 '13 at 4:24
    
@chris Ok I removed all the quotation marks but I still get the compile error: #define FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(fName) int #fName (int id, string msg, string cmd); – Jake M Feb 11 '13 at 4:26
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is all of the quotation marks.

#define FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(fName) "int" #fName "(int id, string msg, string cmd);"

translates to (after concatenating the string literals):

"int abc (int id, string msg, string cmd);"

Whereas,

#define FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(fName) int #fName (int id, string msg, string cmd);

translates to:

int "abc" (int id, string msg, string cmd);

What you really need is simply:

#define FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(fName) int fName (int id, string msg, string cmd);

Use it like this:

FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(abc)

It's all just text replacement. I would personally remove the semicolon in the macro and make the user put one in after each use as well, to make it more like a statement. It feels more natural to me.

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If you're trying to do this, I recommend using the -E flag for g++ (if you're using gcc, MSVC or whatever compiler you're using will have something similar). This will print out the file after the preprocessor has run through it.

Anyway, what you're looking for is something like this:

//No #
#define FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(fName) void fName(int id, string msg, string cmd);

FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(abc) //No ""

void test()
{
    abc(1, "", "");
}
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You need to get away from the stringification. You don't write functions with strings for the names; you don't write such functions in the preprocessor with that notation.

Look at the output from the preprocessor:

g++ -E yourfile.cpp

or its equivalent. The output I get from your two lines is:

"int" "\"abc\"" "(int id, string msg, string cmd);"

And that does not look very much like a function declaration; it is a string containing something that resembles a function declaration (but the nested double quotes confuse even that).

Cleaning up a bit:

#define FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(fName) int fName(int id, string msg, string cmd)
FORWARD_DECLARE_CUSTOM_FUNCT(abc);

Note the transfer of the semi-colon from macro definition to macro invocation; that looks better to a seasoned C++ programmer (though any macros are something of an anathema to C++ programmers; they're more acceptable to C programmers).

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