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In this mozilla article, I read:

Another unusual thing about variables in JavaScript is that you can refer to a variable declared later, without getting an exception. This concept is known as hoisting; variables in JavaScript are in a sense "hoisted" or lifted to the top of the function or statement. However, variables that aren't initialized yet will return a value of undefined.

And then some examples:

/**
 * Example 1
 */
console.log(x === undefined); // logs "true"
var x = 3;


/**
 * Example 2
 */
// will return a value of undefined
var myvar = "my value";

(function() {
  console.log(myvar); // undefined
  var myvar = "local value";
})();

Example 2, above, will be interpreted the same as:

var myvar = "my value";

(function() {
  var myvar;
  console.log(myvar); // undefined
  myvar = "local value";
})();

I fail to see anything being "hoisted"—at least not in the sense that I traditionally interpret the definition of the word: it seems like variables are undefined until after they are declared. In what sense can you "refer to a variable declared later"?

share|improve this question
    
The "this variable is declared in this scope semantics" are hoisted; assignments are not moved. Without hoisting (which would make it a different language :D), the 2nd example would refer to the outer myvar in the log statement. As it is now, it refers to the inner myvar which shadows the outer variables; the value is just undefined at the time of the log statement - hoisting does not affect assignments. –  user166390 Feb 11 '13 at 5:07
    
@pst Okay. bear with me as the fog eventually lifts... Can I ask you what you mean "shadows" the outer variable? –  thomas Feb 11 '13 at 5:13
    
"To momentarily cover" - it prevents the original [outer-scoped variable] from being seen/used :D –  user166390 Feb 11 '13 at 6:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you use var it is "hoisted" to the top of the function declaration. Let's look at the second example again:

var myvar = "my value";

(function() {
  console.log(myvar); // undefined
  var myvar = "local value";
})();

Notice how var myvar = 'my value' is declared first. Next, within the function scope, console.log(myvar) is called. The result is "undefined." Why? You'd think it would be "my value" because that's the order that the code is in.

Because the local variable var myvar in the function scope is hoisted, it's not defined. This is essentially equivalent to writing the function like this:

(function() {
  var myvar;
  console.log(myvar); // undefined
  myvar = "local value";
})();
share|improve this answer
    
So var myvar is understood to be hoisted in the function's scope because it's declared outside of the function, or inside? –  matthewpavkov Feb 11 '13 at 5:05
    
@matthewpavkov because it's declared inside. I'm sure you know that "hoisted" means "lifted up." So imagine the line var myvar is "lifted up" to the top of the inside of the function scope. –  Explosion Pills Feb 11 '13 at 5:07
    
Starting to sort of understand it. Thank you. I just don't understand how var myvar = "my value"; declared immediately before (function() { var myvar;........ in Example 2, that is, its value being declared globally (outside that immediate function directly below) isn't maintained "into" the immediate function. why wouldn't the console.log(myvar); // undefined not be my value? –  thomas Feb 11 '13 at 5:11
    
Also, can you show me a practical example of how this knowledge could be implemented usefully? Thank you so much. –  thomas Feb 11 '13 at 5:11
1  
@thomas it's not something that is to be used handily, it's just part of JavaScript used to prevent errors. You should always declare your variables at the top of the current scope and never rely on hoisting. –  Explosion Pills Feb 11 '13 at 5:12

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