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Does bash run a garbage collector? Can it be controlled via some command line options? I can't find anything on the net about this.

I have a bash script that runs and over a few days its memory usage increases. I want to know where the memory is going.

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I'm pretty sure it does not, but I'm curious why you ask. –  John Zwinck Feb 11 '13 at 5:22
    
What does bash need to collect? It runs other processes, and reaps them as they finish. The variables you set are your responsibility. –  vanza Feb 11 '13 at 5:23
    
@vanza: So should one somehow cleanup the variables used when they are not needed? –  sashang Feb 11 '13 at 5:35
    
@JohnZwinck: I have a bash script that runs and over a few days its memory usage increases. I want to know where the memory is going. –  sashang Feb 11 '13 at 5:38
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Do you have any arrays in your script? Are they associative arrays? If you have either type of array, they could be a source of growth. Have you considered using local variables and functions, so that the variables are destroyed? Which version of bash are you using? Is it the latest? If not, have you tried with the latest? Have you tried running your script under valgrind (well, run bash under valgrind and have it execute your script)? Have you considered breaking the big script into smaller ones that are executed as needed? –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 11 '13 at 5:56
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Bash does not run a garbage collector as such. Since it has no concept of references, there is no need to find data without references. It does free memory no longer in use, though.

Here's a simple demonstration of memory usage before and after declaring and overwriting a large variable. Memory usage goes up then down again:

ps -o rss -p $$
var=$(printf "%s\n" {1..100000})
ps -o rss -p $$
var="smallstring"
ps -o rss -p $$
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