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Trying to use git subtree to share common library files across multiple projects. Here's the problem I keep encountering.

1) Add subtree so "lib" subdirectory of my project is coming from lib-dk repository.

$ git subtree add --prefix=lib --squash git@bitbucket.org:dwknight/lib-dk.git master

2) Make changes to files in "lib"

3) commit changes to main project repo

$ git commit -am "update project"

4) push updates to main project repo

$ git push origin master

5) push changes in "lib" back to "lib-dk" repo

$ git subtree push --prefix=lib git@bitbucket.org:dwknight/lib-dk.git master
git push using:  git@bitbucket.org:dwknight/lib-dk.git master
To git@bitbucket.org:dwknight/lib-dk.git
 ! [rejected]        f455c24a79447c6e3fe1690f5709357b7f96828a -> master (non-fast-forward)
error: failed to push some refs to 'git@bitbucket.org:dwknight/lib-dk.git'
hint: Updates were rejected because the tip of your current branch is behind its remote counterpart. Merge the remote changes (e.g. 'git pull') before pushing again.
hint: See the 'Note about fast-forwards' in 'git push --help' for details.

6) I get this rejection even if nothing has changed in the lib-dk repo. When I try a pull, it acts like something has but I'm able to update via the pull. Still the push continues to be rejected.

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I have no experience using the subtree command but the --squash operation looks like a rebase option. What does it do? If it's modifying the branch history somehow then that could cause this problem. –  Andrew Myers Feb 11 '13 at 16:22

1 Answer 1

When I try this without the --squash option to git subtree add, it works. I think, as the commenter suggested, the --squash is fiddling with the history in an unhelpful way.

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