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This is the question im trying to answer:

What i have is:

SELECT DISTINCT a1.acnum
FROM academic a1, academic a2
WHERE a1.deptnum = a2.deptnum
AND a1.acnum <> a2.acnum
AND a1.acnum IN (Select acnum
from interest
group by acnum
having count(acnum) >1);

which is wrong because what im doing is if acnum (academic number) 218 works in the same dept as acnum 217, AND has the same interests as acnum 199 (diff department) then i add acnum 218 to the list.

HOWEVER, I should only add acnum 218 and 217 if BOTH of them have the same amount of field interests.

interest table has fieldnum , acnum

Academic table has acnum , deptnum, name

department table has deptnum, deptName

 FIELDNUM           ACNUM DESCRIP                                                                        
------------------ -------------------- 
292                 100  Multiprocessor and Special purpose computer design                               
293                 100  General (HW)                                                                     
293                 197  Computer architecture  

The output should only list all the academics' number.. but to make it a bit clear:

Acnum Deptnum Interest
1        1       g&f
2        1       g&f
3        2        f
4        3        l
5        4       r&l
6        4       r&l

The output should be: 1 2 5 6

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1  
it would be nice if you provide sample data and expected out put –  Rahul Vasantrao Kamble Feb 11 '13 at 7:23
    
Which DBMS are you using? Oracle? Postgres? –  a_horse_with_no_name Feb 11 '13 at 7:56
    
Im using Oracle –  DFY Feb 11 '13 at 8:02

4 Answers 4

Use a common table expression (sub-query) to get the academics, their departments and a count of their interestes. Then query from it twice to get the required output.

with cte as ( select a.acnum
                     , a.deptnum
                     , count(i.acnum) as int_cnt
              from academic a
                   , interest i
              where i.acnum = a.acnum
              group by  a.acnum
                     , a.deptnum
            )
select ct1.acnum
       , cte1.deptnum
       , cte1.in_cnt
from cte cte1
     , cte cte2
where cte2.deptnum = cte1.deptnum 
and cte2.int_cnt = cte1.int_cnt  
and cte2.acnum != cte1.acnum 
order by cte1.deptnum
         , cte1.acnum

caveat - not actually tested, so while the logic is sound the syntax may be awry ;)

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Untested but should be good

SELECT DISTINCT a1.acnum
FROM academic a1
INNER JOIN academic a2 ON a1.deptnum = a2.deptnum
                          AND 
                          a1.acnum <> a2.acnum
INNER JOIN interest i1 ON a1.acnum=i1.acnum
GROUP BY a1.acnum
HAVING COUNT(i1.acnum)=(SELECT COUNT(*)
                        FROM interest i2
                        WHERE i1.acnum=i2.acnum)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you.. ill try to understand what you've done in a min.. but i tested it and i got an error.. "not a GROUP BY expression" –  DFY Feb 11 '13 at 7:46
    
the last bit: > (SELECT COUNT(i2.acnum) > FROM interest i2 > WHERE i1.acnum=i2.acnum) I don't think its right to put the "i1.acnum".. as we only have interest i2 –  DFY Feb 11 '13 at 8:23

As per my understanding it should work

SELECT 
      listagg(a1.acnum,',') within group( order by a1.acnum) , a1.deptnum,a2.cnt
FROM 
     academic a1,
     (Select 
            acnum,count(*) as cnt
      from interest
      group by acnum
     ) a2
where 
     a1.acnum=a2.acnum
group by 
     a1.deptnum,a2.cnt
having count(*)>1;
share|improve this answer

Perhaps using JOIN could give you better results here:

SELECT DISTINCT a1.acnum
FROM academic a1
JOIN academic a2
ON a1.deptnum = a2.deptnum
AND a1.acnum <> a2.acnum
AND a1.acnum IN (Select acnum
from interest
group by acnum
having count(acnum) >1);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you.. but i think the problem is with my logic.. :) –  DFY Feb 11 '13 at 7:47

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