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Is there a preprocessor directive that checks whether a constant is not defined. I am aware of the #ifndef directive but I am also looking for a #elif not defined directive. Does #elif not defined exist?

This is how I would use it:

#define REGISTER_CUSTOM_CALLBACK_FUNCTION(callbackFunctName) \
    #ifndef CUSTOM_CALLBACK_1 \
        #define CUSTOM_CALLBACK_1 \
        FORWARD_DECLARE_CALLBACK_FUNCTION(callbackFunctName) \
    #elif not defined CUSTOM_CALLBACK_2 \
        #define CUSTOM_CALLBACK_2  \
        FORWARD_DECLARE_CALLBACK_FUNCTION(callbackFunctName) \
    #elif not not defined CUSTOM_CALLBACK_3 \
        #define CUSTOM_CALLBACK_3  \
        FORWARD_DECLARE_CALLBACK_FUNCTION(callbackFunctName) \
    #endif
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why not use ifndef? –  Dariusz Feb 11 '13 at 8:30
    
#elif not not defined CUSTOM_CALLBACK_3 not not defined? –  JustMaximumPower Feb 11 '13 at 8:30
    
What are you trying to do? You cannot define macros that contain other preprocessor directives. You cannot make #define or #if or #elif a part of a macro. Your macro has to be redesigned to make sure it has no inner "branching". All macro-branching has to be done "on the outside". It cannot be "embedded" into a macro. –  AnT Feb 11 '13 at 8:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

How about the

#elif !defined(...)

But you've got bigger problems - the trailing \ exclude the other directives - or rather make them illegal. So, even with the valid syntax, your definitions won't do what you want.

You'll need to move the initial define inside the conditions.

#ifndef CUSTOM_CALLBACK_1
    #define CUSTOM_CALLBACK_1 
    #define REGISTER_CUSTOM_CALLBACK_FUNCTION(callbackFunctName) \
    FORWARD_DECLARE_CALLBACK_FUNCTION(callbackFunctName) 
#elif !defined(CUSTOM_CALLBACK_2)
    //.....
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