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String str="123456.7855456677";
ParsePosition parsePosition = new ParsePosition(0);
NumberFormat numberFormat=new DecimalFormat();
Number number=numberFormat.parse(str, parsePosition);

if(parsePosition.getIndex()!=str.length())
{
    throw new IllegalArgumentException();
}

numberFormat.setMaximumFractionDigits(2);
numberFormat.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
double value=Double.parseDouble(numberFormat.format(number));
System.out.println(value);

The value of the String type variable str in this segment of code can be any dynamic value, assuming a user is free to input any string.

The Double.parseDouble() method on the second last line causes the java.lang.NumberFormatException to be thrown.

Removing the line numberFormat.setMaximumFractionDigits(2); and setting a RegEx to the overloaded constructor of the DecimalFormat class instead as usual like,

NumberFormat numberFormat=new DecimalFormat("#.##");

suppresses the exception.

So, why doesn't it work otherwise?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you can debug the code then check out put of this line numberFormat.format(number) it gives a number containing a comma that might becoming reason for exception, check this 123,456.79 and this comma should not be there... hope this will help.

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The input string is however 123456.7855456677. –  Tiny Feb 11 '13 at 9:14
1  
The input string is numberFormat.format(number) –  Christophe Roussy Feb 11 '13 at 9:15
    
The original string 123456.7855456677 held by the String type variable str is represented as Number before parsing it to Double. –  Tiny Feb 11 '13 at 9:17
2  
While scanning through the list of methods available in the NumberFormat class, I could see, it has to do something with grouping in a number, a number is by default represented in a group like 111,222,333. I have used numberFormat.setGroupingUsed(false); and the exception disappeared. –  Tiny Feb 11 '13 at 9:33
    
@Tiny +1 for a good question and nice comment... :) –  zzzz Feb 11 '13 at 9:40

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: "123,456.79" You cannot have a comma inside the string representation of double numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
The input string is however 123456.7855456677. –  Tiny Feb 11 '13 at 9:15
1  
No the input of the Double.parseDouble function is the result of numberFormat.format(number) which is 123,456.79, which contains a comma and causes the exception –  Christophe Roussy Feb 11 '13 at 9:17

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