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Imagine that I have this class:

public class Test
{
  private String[] arr = new String[]{"1","2"};    

  public String[] getArr() 
  {
    return arr;
  }
}

Now, I have another class that uses the above class:

Test test = new Test();
test.getArr()[0] ="some value!"; //!!!

So this is the problem: I have accessed a private field of a class from outside! How can I prevent this? I mean how can I make this array immutable? Does this mean that with every getter method you can work your way up to access the private field? (I don't want any libraries such as Guava. I just need to know the right way to do this).

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35  
@DuniyaHilaDalunga: That won't have any effect on changing its contents. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 11 '13 at 9:34
7  
Actually, making it final does prevent the modification of the field. However, preventing the modification of the Object referred to by a field is more complicated. –  OldCurmudgeon Feb 11 '13 at 9:42
22  
There's a problem with your mental model if you think being able to modify an array to which you have a reference stored in a private field is the same as being able to modify a private field. –  Joren Feb 11 '13 at 10:18
42  
If it's private, why expose it in the first place? –  Erik Reppen Feb 11 '13 at 13:59
7  
It took me a while to figure this out but it always improves my code when I ensure that all data structures are completely encapsulated within their object--meaning there is no way to "Get" your "arr", instead do whever you must inside the class or provide an iterator. –  Bill K Feb 11 '13 at 21:23

10 Answers 10

up vote 154 down vote accepted

You must return a copy of your array.

public String[] getArr() {
  return arr == null ? null : Arrays.copyOf(arr, arr.length);
}
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112  
I would like to remind people that although this has been voted the correct answer to the question, the best solution to the problem is actually as sp00m says - to return an Unmodifiable List. –  OldCurmudgeon Feb 11 '13 at 12:10
45  
Not if you actually need to return an array. –  Svish Feb 11 '13 at 12:13
8  
Actually, the best solution to the problem discussed is often as @MikhailVladimirov says: - to provide or return a view of the array or collection. –  Christoffer Hammarström Feb 11 '13 at 12:27
19  
but do make sure it's a deep copy, not a shallow copy, of the data. For Strings it makes no difference, for other classes like Date where the content of the instance can be modified it can make a difference. –  jwenting Feb 11 '13 at 13:47
14  
@Svish I should’ve been more drastic: if you return an array from an API function you’re doing it wrong. In private functions inside a library it might be right. In an API (where protection against modifiability plays a role), it never is. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 11 '13 at 14:42

If you can use a List instead of an array, Collections provides an unmodifiable list:

public List<String> getList() {
    return Collections.unmodifiableList(list);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Added an answer that uses Collections.unmodifiableList(list) as assignment to the field, to make sure that the list isn't changed by the class itself. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 29 at 1:44
    
Just wondering, If you decompile this method you get a lot of new keywords. Doesn't this hurt the performance when getList() get access a lot. For example in render code. –  Thomas15v Dec 15 at 7:52

Modifier private protects only field itself from being accessed from other classes, but not the object references by this field. If you need to protect referenced object, just do not give it out. Change

public String [] getArr ()
{
    return arr;
}

to:

public String [] getArr ()
{
    return arr.clone ();
}

or to

public int getArrLength ()
{
    return arr.length;
}

public String getArrElementAt (int index)
{
    return arr [index];
}
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13  
    
@LukasKnuth what is wrong with clone()? –  Mikhail Vladimirov Feb 17 '13 at 17:32
    
read the linked article (or just the section). –  Lukas Knuth Feb 17 '13 at 17:41
3  
This article does not argue against using clone on arrays, only on objects that can be subclassed. –  Lyn Headley Feb 24 '13 at 17:16

The Collections.unmodifiableList has already been mentioned - the Arrays.asList() strangely not! My solution would also be to use the list from the outside and wrap the array as follows:

String[] arr = new String[]{"1", "2"}; 
public List<String> getList() {
    Collections.unmodifiableList(Arrays.asList(arr));
}

The problem with copying the array is: if you're doing it every time you access the code and the array is big, you'll create a lot of work for the garbage collector for sure. So the copy is a simple but really bad approach - I'd say "cheap", but memory-expensive! Especially when you're having more than just 2 elements.

If you look at the source code of Arrays.asList and Collections.unmodifiableList there is actually not much created. The first just wraps the array without copying it, the second just wraps the list, making changes to it unavailable.

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You make the assumption here that the array including the strings is copied each time. It isn't, only the references to the immutable strings are copied. As long as your array is not huge, the overhead is negligible. If the array is huge, go for lists and immutableList all the way! –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 29 at 1:10
    
No, I didn't make that assumption - where? It is about the references that are copied - doesn't matter if it is a String or any other object. Just saying that for big arrays I wouldn't recommend copying the array and that the Arrays.asList and Collections.unmodifiableList operations are probably cheaper for bigger arrays. Maybe someone can calculate how many elements are necessary, but I've already seen code in for-loops with arrays containing thousands of elements being copied just to prevent modification - that's insane! –  michael_s Jul 30 at 6:23

You can also use ImmutableList which should be better than the standard unmodifiableList. The class is part of Guava libraries that was create by Google.

Here is the description:

Unlike Collections.unmodifiableList(java.util.List), which is a view of a separate collection that can still change, an instance of ImmutableList contains its own private data and will never change

Here is a simple example of how to use it:

public class Test
{
  private String[] arr = new String[]{"1","2"};    

  public ImmutableList<String> getArr() 
  {
    return ImmutableList.copyOf(arr);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Use this solution if you cannot trust the Test class to leave the returned list unaltered. You need to make sure that ImmutableList is returned, and that the elements of the list are immutable as well. Otherwise my solution should be safe as well. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 29 at 2:03

at this point of view you should use system array copy:

public String[] getArr() {
   if (arr != null) {
      String[] arrcpy = new String[arr.length];
      System.arraycopy(arr, 0, arrcpy, 0, arr.length);
      return arrcpy;
   } else
      return null;
   }
}
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-1 as it doesn't do anything over calling clone, and is not as concise. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 29 at 1:16

You could return a copy of the data. The caller who chooses to change the data will only be changing the copy

public class Test {
    private static String[] arr = new String[] { "1", "2" };

    public String[] getArr() {

        String[] b = new String[arr.length];

        System.arraycopy(arr, 0, b, 0, arr.length);

        return b;
    }
}
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The nub of the problem is that you are returning a pointer to a mutable object. Oops. Either you render the object immutable (the unmodifiable list solution) or you return a copy of the object.

As a general matter, finality of objects does not protect objects from being changed if they are mutable. These two problems are "kissing cousins."

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Well Java has references, while C has pointers. Enough said. Further, the "final" modifier can have multiple impacts depending on where it is applied. Applying on a class member will enforce you to only assign value to the member exactly once with the "=" (assignment) operator. This has nothing to do with immutability. If you replace the reference of a member to a new one (some other instance from the same class), the previous instance will remain unchanged (but may be GCed if no other references are holding them). –  gyabraham Feb 13 '13 at 10:17

Yes, you should return a a copy of the array:

 public String[] getArr()
 {
    return Arrays.copyOf(arr);
 }
share|improve this answer
    
-1 as this single argument method does not exist. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 29 at 1:20

Returning an unmodifiable list is a good idea. But a list that is made unmodifiable during the call to the getter method can still be changed by the class, or classes that are derived from the class.

Instead you should make it clear to anybody that extends the class that the list should not be modified.

So in your example it could lead to the following code:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;

public class Test {
    public static final List<String> STRINGS =
        Collections.unmodifiableList(
            Arrays.asList("1", "2"));

    public final List<String> getStrings() {
        return STRINGS;
    }
}

In the above example I've made the STRINGS field public, in principle you could do away with the method call, as the values are already known.

You could also assign the strings to a private final List<String> field made unmodifiable during construction of the class instance. Using a constant or instantiation arguments (of the constructor) depends on the design of the class.

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;

public class Test {
    private final List<String> strings;

    public Test(final String ... strings) {
        this.strings = Collections.unmodifiableList(Arrays
                .asList(strings));
    }

    public final List<String> getStrings() {
        return strings;
    }
}
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