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I need to report the # of sequences in an array. For example:

A=[ 1 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 0 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 1 1 -1 -1 1 0 1 1]

and I have to report the # of times a number comes consecutively, such as, one sequence of

5 -1s ([-1 -1 -1 -1 -1]) and one sequence of

4 -1s ([-1 -1 -1 -1]).

How can I find how many sequences of numbers there are?

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StackOverflow is not a code-writing service. Please read the guide to asking a good question and show what you have tried. You might also want to explain what programming language you are using. –  RB. Feb 11 '13 at 9:42
    
I am using Matlab and I tried using ismember function so that I could find a set in the target array, however it did not give me the number of sequences embedded in my target array. Is there a particular function that i am missing ? –  user2060814 Feb 11 '13 at 10:06
    
Why don't you just loop over the array and track the status as you progress? –  Dennis Jaheruddin Feb 11 '13 at 10:35
    
For the number of sequences 1+sum(diff(A)~=0) should work. –  user1884905 Feb 11 '13 at 10:41
    
thank you I tried that @user1884905 but it still does not give me what I need. What I need is a report of the frequency of repeating sequences. For example for the array A (A=[ 1 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 0 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 1 1 -1 -1 1 0 1 1]) there are 1 sequence of 5 -1s, 1 sequence of 4 -1s, 4 sequences of 2 1 or -1s and no sequence of 3 anything.. It is similar to chunking groups of consecutively repeating numbers. –  user2060814 Feb 11 '13 at 11:35

2 Answers 2

If you only have a few number of possible element values in A (as in the example in the question where there only are three values, -1, 0 and 1) you could loop through these and use the following few steps to get the lengths of the different sequences.

Here is an example checking A == -1:

A = [1 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 0 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 1 1 -1 -1 1 0 1 1];
B = [0, A==-1, 0];

Use the diff() function to find the beginning and end of each sequence and subtract the two vector to get the sequence lengths.

>> C = find(diff(B)==-1)-find(diff(B)==1)

C =

     5     4     2

Here we can see that there is one sequence of length five, followed by one of length four and one of lenth two. We could also use histc() to get the frequency of these lengths in a vector.

>> D = histc(C,1:max(C))

D =

     0     1     0     1     1

Repeating the procedure with another value, for example checking B = [0, A==1, 0]; gives us:

C =

     2     1     2     1     2

D =

     2     3
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You may use run-length encoding to perform this task

function [rl data] = runLength( vec )
% run length encoding for vector vec
rl = ( find( vec ~= [vec(2:end), vec(end)+1] ) );
data = vec( rl );
rl(2:end) = rl(2:end) - rl(1:end-1);

Applying run-length encoding to A

>> [rl data] = runLength( A )
rl =
   [ 2 5 1 1 4 2 2 1 1 2 ]
data =
   [ 1 -1 0 1 -1 1 -1 1 0 1 ]

So, if you are interested in the number of sequences of length > n all you need is

>> nnz( rl > n )
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