Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to learn how to change this program into a for loop for the sake of knowing both ways

def Diff(a_list):
    num = enumerate(max(x) - min(x) for x in a_list)
    return max(x[::-1] for x in num)

I want it to be something like

def Diff(x):
    for a in x

if it helps the program is intended to return the row that has the smallest sum of the elements inside it so like [[1,2,3,4],[-500],[10,20]] would be 1.

share|improve this question
    
Woops, put (x) instead of (a_list) –  JGrazza Feb 11 '13 at 9:52
1  
Your function does not do what you say it does. Please clarify. –  Janne Karila Feb 11 '13 at 10:11
    
Do you want a loop-rewrite of you function or a corrected version of your function? –  Thorsten Kranz Feb 11 '13 at 10:17
    
Now my answer should cover all your questions. –  Thorsten Kranz Feb 11 '13 at 10:31

3 Answers 3

I do not understand why you use this name for your function, it does something else (as far as I understand). It searches for the inner-list inside a list for which the difference between min and max, the span, are maximal and the n returns a tuple (span, idx), idx being the index within the outer loop.

When you want to have the same as a loop, try:

def minRow_loop(a_list):
    rv = (0,0)
    for idx, row in enumerate(a_list):
        span = max(row) - min(row)
        span_and_idx = (span, idx)
        if span_and_idx > rv:
            rv = span_and_idx
    return rv

But your code doesn't do what it'S intended to do, so I created two correct versions, once with and once without a loop.

import random
random.seed(12346)

def minRow(a_list):
    num = enumerate(max(x) - min(x) for x in a_list)
    return max(x[::-1] for x in num)

def minRow_loop(a_list):
    rv = (0,0)
    for idx, row in enumerate(a_list):
        span = max(row) - min(row)
        span_and_idx = (span, idx)
        if span_and_idx > rv:
            rv = span_and_idx
    return rv

def minRow_correct(a_list):
    return min(enumerate([sum(l) for  l in a_list]),
               key=lambda (idx, val): val)[0]

def minRow_correct_loop(a_list):
    min_idx = 0
    min_sum = 10e50
    for idx, list_ in enumerate(a_list):
        sum_ = sum(list_)
        if sum_<min_sum:
            min_idx = idx
            min_sum = sum
    return min_idx

li = [[random.random() for i in range(2)] for j in range(3)]
from pprint import pprint
print "Input:"
pprint(li)

print "\nWrong versions"
print minRow(li)
print minRow_loop(li)

which prints:

Input:
[[0.46318380478657073, 0.7396007585882016],
 [0.38778699106140135, 0.7078233515518557],
 [0.7453097328344933, 0.23853757442660117]]

Wrong versions
(0.5067721584078921, 2)
(0.5067721584078921, 2)

Corrected versions
2
2
share|improve this answer

What you want can actually be done in two lines of code:

# Let's take the list from your example
lst = [[1,2,3,4],[-500],[10,20]]

# Create a new list holding the sums of each sublist using a list comprehension
sums = [sum(sublst) for sublst in lst]

# Get the index of the smallest element
sums.index(min(sums))  # Returns: 1
share|improve this answer
    
This is not a loop - OP asked for a loop for educational reasons. And using sums.index(min(sums)), you iterate the list twice. –  Thorsten Kranz Feb 11 '13 at 11:58

if you're looking for minimum sum, just go through every row and keep track of the smallest:

def minRow(theList):
    foundIndex = 0 # assume first element is the answer for now.
    minimumSum = sum(theList[0])

    for index, row in enumerate(theList):
        if sum(row) < minimumSum:
            foundIndex = index
            minimumSum = sum(row) # you don't have to sum() twice, but it looks cleaner

    return foundIndex

If your looking for greatest range (like the first Diff() function), it'd be similar. You'd keep track of the greatest range and return its index.

Thorsten's answer is very complete. But since I finished this anyway, I'm submitting my "dumbed down" version in case it helps you understand.

share|improve this answer
    
You need to initialize foundIndex to 0, not 1. –  Janne Karila Feb 11 '13 at 10:54
    
yeah, was overthinking it, thanks. –  Jeremy SH Feb 11 '13 at 10:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.