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I have to read a lot of data into:

vector<char>

A 3rd party library reads this data in many turns. In each turn it calls my callback function whose signature is like this:

CallbackFun ( int CBMsgFileItemID,
              unsigned long CBtag,
              void* CBuserInfo,
              int CBdataSize,
              void* CBdataBuffer,
              int CBisFirst,
              int CBisLast )
{

   ...

}

Currently I have implemented a buffer container using an STL Container where my method insert() and getBuff are provided to insert a new buffer and getting stored buffer. But still I want better performing code, so that I can minimize allocations and de-allocations:

template<typename T1>
class buffContainer
{
private:
    	class atomBuff
    	{
    	private:
    		atomBuff(const atomBuff& arObj);
    		atomBuff operator=(const atomBuff& arObj);
    		public:
    		int len;
    		char *buffPtr;
    		atomBuff():len(0),buffPtr(NULL)
    		{}
    		~atomBuff()
    		{
    			if(buffPtr!=NULL)
    				delete []buffPtr;
    		}
    	};
public :
    buffContainer():_totalLen(0){}
void insert(const char const *aptr,const  unsigned long  &alen);
unsigned long getBuff(T1 &arOutObj);

private:
    std::vector<atomBuff*> moleculeBuff;
    int _totalLen;
};
template<typename T1>
void buffContainer< T1>::insert(const char const *aPtr,const  unsigned long  &aLen)
{
    if(aPtr==NULL,aLen<=0)
    	return;
    atomBuff *obj=new atomBuff();
    obj->len=aLen;
    obj->buffPtr=new char[aLen];
    memcpy(obj->buffPtr,aPtr,aLen);
    _totalLen+=aLen;
    moleculeBuff.push_back(obj);

}
template<typename T1>
unsigned long buffContainer<T1>::getBuff(T1 &arOutObj)
{
    std::cout<<"Total Lenght of Data is: "<<_totalLen<<std::endl;
    if(_totalLen==0)
    	return _totalLen;
    // Note : Logic pending for case size(T1) > T2::Value_Type
    int noOfObjRqd=_totalLen/sizeof(T1::value_type);
    arOutObj.resize(noOfObjRqd);
    char *ptr=(char*)(&arOutObj[0]);
    for(std::vector<atomBuff*>::const_iterator itr=moleculeBuff.begin();itr!=moleculeBuff.end();itr++)
    {
    	memcpy(ptr,(*itr)->buffPtr,(*itr)->len);
    	ptr+= (*itr)->len;
    }
    std::cout<<arOutObj.size()<<std::endl;

    return _totalLen;
}

How can I make this more performant?

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1  
What is the question? –  jalf Sep 26 '09 at 10:51
    
Question is that .. Is there better and efficient way to do so –  Satbir Sep 26 '09 at 11:03
    
Explain the callback function better. What data there are you copying into your vector, and how? –  jmucchiello Sep 28 '09 at 6:05
    
thanks jmucchiello Callback i need to implement , The signature of callback is fixed as i have given –  Satbir Sep 28 '09 at 6:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If my wild guess about your callback function makes sense, you don't need anything more than a vector:

std::vector<char> foo;
foo.reserve(MAGIC); // this is the important part. Reserve the right amount here.
                    // and you don't have any reallocs.
setup_callback_fun(CallbackFun, &foo);

CallbackFun ( int CBMsgFileItemID,
              unsigned long CBtag,
              void* CBuserInfo,
              int CBdataSize,
              void* CBdataBuffer,
              int CBisFirst,
              int CBisLast )
{
     std::vector<char>* pFoo = static_cast<std::vector<char>*>(CBuserInfo);

     char* data = static_cast<char*>CBdataBuffer;
     pFoo->insert(pFoo->end(), data, data+CBdataSize);
}
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Yes you are correct, This is right implementation –  Satbir Sep 28 '09 at 6:29

Depending on how you plan to use the result, you might try putting the incoming data into a rope datastructure instead of vector, especially if the strings you expect to come in are very large. Appending to the rope is very fast, but subsequent char-by-char traversal is slower by a constant factor. The tradeoff might work out for you or not, I don't know what you need to do with the result.

EDIT: I see from your comment this is no option, then. I don't think you can do much more efficient in the general case when the size of the data coming in is totally arbitrary. Otherwise you could try to initially reserve enough space in the vector so that the data will fit without or at most one reallocation in the average case or so.

One thing I noticed about your code:

if(aPtr==NULL,aLen<=0)

I think you mean

if(aPtr==NULL || aLen<=0)
share|improve this answer
    
My Requirement are like : 1) Call read Function 2) Put all buffer in vector<char> 3) Give vector<char> to another module <- So (vector<char>)is fixed –  Satbir Sep 26 '09 at 11:55

The main thing you can do is avoid doing quite so much copying of the data. Right now, when insert() is called, you're copying the data into your buffer. Then, when getbuff() is called, you're copying the data out to a buffer they've (hopefully) specified. So, to get data from outside to them, you're copying each byte twice.

This part:

arOutObj.resize(noOfObjRqd);
char *ptr=(char*)(&arOutObj[0]);

Seems to assume that arOutObj is really a vector. If so, it would be a whole lot better to rewrite getbuff as a normal function taking a (reference to a) vector instead of being a template that really only works for one type of parameter.

From there, it becomes a fairly simple matter to completely eliminate one copy of the data. In insert(), instead of manually allocating memory and tracking the size, put the data directly into a vector. Then, when getbuff() is called, instead of copying the data into their buffer, just give then a reference to your existing vector.

class buffContainer {
    std::vector<char> moleculeBuff;
public:
    void insert(char const *p, unsigned long len) { 
Edit: Here you really want to add:
        moleculeBuff.reserve(moleculeBuff.size()+len);
End of edit.
        std::copy(p, p+len, std::back_inserter(moleculeBuff));
    }

    void getbuff(vector<char> &output) { 
        output = moleculeBuff;
    }
};

Note that I've changed the result of getbuff to void -- since you're giving them a vector, its size is known, and there's no point in returning the size. In reality, you might want to actually change the signature a bit, to just return the buffer:

vector<char> getbuff() { 
    vector<char> temp;
    temp.swap(moleculeBuff);
    return temp;
}

Since it's returning a (potentially large) vector by value, this depends heavily on your compiler implementing the named return value optimization (NRVO), but 1) the worst case is that it does about what you were doing before anyway, and 2) virtually all reasonably current compilers DO implement NRVO.

This also addresses one other detail your original code didn't (seem to). As it was, getbuff returns some data, but if you call it again, it (apparently doesn't keep track of what data has already been returned, so it returns it all again. It keeps allocating data, but never deletes any of it. That's what the swap is for: it creates an empty vector, and then swaps that with the one that's being maintained by buffContainer, so buffContainer now has an empty vector, and the filled one is handed over to whatever called getbuff().

Another way to do things would be to take the swap a step further: basically, you have two buffers:

  1. one owned by buffContainer
  2. one owned by whatever calls getbuffer()

In the normal course of things, we can probably expect that the buffer sizes will quickly reach some maximum size. From there on, we'd really like to simply re-cycle that space: read some data into one, pass it to be processed, and while that's happening, read data into the other.

As it happens, that's pretty easy to do too. Change getbuff() to look something like this:

void getbuff(vector<char> &output) {
    swap(moleculeBuff, output);
    moleculeBuff.clear();
}

This should improve speed quite a bit -- instead of copying data back and forth, it just swaps one vector's pointer to the data with the others (along with a couple other details like the current allocation size, and used size of the vector). The clear is normally really fast -- for a vector (or any type without a dtor) it'll just set the number of items in the vector to zero (if the items have dtors, it has to destroy them, of course). From there, the next time insert() is called, the new data will just be copied into the memory the vector already owns (until/unless it needs more space than the vector had allocated).

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