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So, say I have something like the following:

public class Element
{
  public int ID;
  public int Type;
  public Properties prorerty;
  ...
}
and

public class Properties
{
  public int Id;
  public string Property;
  ...
}

and I have a list of these:

List Elements = new List();

What would be the cleanest way to get a list of all distinct values in the prorerty column in Element class? I mean, I could iterate through the list and add all values that aren't duplicates to another list of strings, but this seems dirty and inefficient. I have a feeling there's some magical Linq construction that'll do this in one line, but I haven't been able to come up with anything.

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1  
    
You don't you rather use set – exexzian Feb 11 '13 at 10:18
 var results = Elements.Distinct();

Note: you will have to override .Equals and .GetHashCode()

public class Element : IEqualityComparer<Element>
{
   public bool Equals(Element x, Element y)
   {
     if (x.ID == y.ID)
     {
        return true;
     }
     else
     {
        return false;
     }
   }
}

public int GetHashCode(Element obj)
{
    return obj.ID.GetHashCode();
}
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2  
Or pass a custom IEqualityComparer. :) – Patryk Ćwiek Feb 11 '13 at 10:17
    
To me it sounds like he just wants a collections of string. He can use a predefined equality comparer for System.String for that. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 11 '13 at 10:29
    
Implementing IEqualityComparer<Element> in Element is quite unusual. Either create an ElementComparer class or implement IComparable<Element> in Element. – Simon Mourier Feb 11 '13 at 10:55
    
@Mykhalik - did this help? If so, please mark it as the answer. – Darren Davies Mar 19 '13 at 13:00
    
@Downvoter - care to comment? – Darren Davies Jun 20 '13 at 9:46
var props = Elements.Select(x => x.Properties).Distinct();

And make sure you overridden .Equals() and .GetHashCode() methods.
Or if you need direct strings from Properties:

var props = Elements
    .Select(x => x.Properties != null ? x.Properties.Property : null)
    .Distinct();
share|improve this answer

If you need the string fields on the Properties field, and if you know the Properties field prorerty is never null, just use

IEnumerable<string> uniqueStrings = Elements
  .Select(e => e.prorerty.Property).Distinct();

If there's a chance prorerty can be null, handle that situation in the lambda.

This will use the default equality comparer for String which is an ordinal comparison independent of culture and case-sensitive.

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my working example from LINQPad (C# Program)

void Main()
{
    var ret = new List<Element>();
    ret.Add(new Element(){ID=1});
    ret.Add(new Element(){ID=1});
    ret.Add(new Element(){ID=2});
    ret = ret.GroupBy(x=>x.ID).Select(x=>x.First()).ToList();
    Console.WriteLine(ret.Count()); // shows 2
}

public class Element
{
  public int ID;
  public int Type;
  public Properties prorerty; 
}

public class Properties
{
  public int Id;
  public string Property;

}
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