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I'm looking for a way to do the following PHP code in Ruby in a succinct and efficient manner:

$normalizeChars = array('Š'=>'S', 'š'=>'s', 'Ð'=>'Dj','Ž'=>'Z', 'ž'=>'z', 'À'=>'A', 'Á'=>'A', 'Â'=>'A', 'Ã'=>'A', 'Ä'=>'A',
        'Å'=>'A', 'Æ'=>'A', 'Ç'=>'C', 'È'=>'E', 'É'=>'E', 'Ê'=>'E', 'Ë'=>'E', 'Ì'=>'I', 'Í'=>'I', 'Î'=>'I',
        'Ï'=>'I', 'Ñ'=>'N', 'Ò'=>'O', 'Ó'=>'O', 'Ô'=>'O', 'Õ'=>'O', 'Ö'=>'O', 'Ø'=>'O', 'Ù'=>'U', 'Ú'=>'U',
        'Û'=>'U', 'Ü'=>'U', 'Ý'=>'Y', 'Þ'=>'B', 'ß'=>'Ss','à'=>'a', 'á'=>'a', 'â'=>'a', 'ã'=>'a', 'ä'=>'a',
        'å'=>'a', 'æ'=>'a', 'ç'=>'c', 'è'=>'e', 'é'=>'e', 'ê'=>'e', 'ë'=>'e', 'ì'=>'i', 'í'=>'i', 'î'=>'i',
        'ï'=>'i', 'ð'=>'o', 'ñ'=>'n', 'ò'=>'o', 'ó'=>'o', 'ô'=>'o', 'õ'=>'o', 'ö'=>'o', 'ø'=>'o', 'ù'=>'u',
        'ú'=>'u', 'û'=>'u', 'ý'=>'y', 'ý'=>'y', 'þ'=>'b', 'ÿ'=>'y', 'ƒ'=>'f');
$cleanGenre = strtr($this->entryArray['genre'], $normalizeChars);

Here the strtr() function will replace the character on the left with the one on the right in the array. Pretty handy for a cleanup job. But I can't seem to find anywhint similar in Ruby, that is, a way to specify which characters to replace all in one array rather than with lengthy conditionals for each character.

Note that tr won't work cause you can't replace one letter with two (D => Dj). Plus it gives me an InvalidByteSequenceError: "\xC5" on US-ASCII for this line:

    entry["genre"].tr('ŠšŽž', 'SsZz')

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
would this work: stackoverflow.com/a/7836947/166029 ? –  keymone Feb 11 '13 at 10:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'll make it easy for you to implement

#encoding: UTF-8
t = 'ŠšÐŽžÀÁÂÃÄAÆAÇÈÉÊËÌÎÑNÒOÓOÔOÕOÖOØOUÚUUÜUÝYÞBßSàaáaâäaaæaçcèéêëìîðñòóôõöùûýýþÿƒ'
fallback = { 
  'Š'=>'S', 'š'=>'s', 'Ð'=>'Dj','Ž'=>'Z', 'ž'=>'z', 'À'=>'A', 'Á'=>'A', 'Â'=>'A', 'Ã'=>'A', 'Ä'=>'A',
  'Å'=>'A', 'Æ'=>'A', 'Ç'=>'C', 'È'=>'E', 'É'=>'E', 'Ê'=>'E', 'Ë'=>'E', 'Ì'=>'I', 'Í'=>'I', 'Î'=>'I',
  'Ï'=>'I', 'Ñ'=>'N', 'Ò'=>'O', 'Ó'=>'O', 'Ô'=>'O', 'Õ'=>'O', 'Ö'=>'O', 'Ø'=>'O', 'Ù'=>'U', 'Ú'=>'U',
  'Û'=>'U', 'Ü'=>'U', 'Ý'=>'Y', 'Þ'=>'B', 'ß'=>'Ss','à'=>'a', 'á'=>'a', 'â'=>'a', 'ã'=>'a', 'ä'=>'a',
  'å'=>'a', 'æ'=>'a', 'ç'=>'c', 'è'=>'e', 'é'=>'e', 'ê'=>'e', 'ë'=>'e', 'ì'=>'i', 'í'=>'i', 'î'=>'i',
  'ï'=>'i', 'ð'=>'o', 'ñ'=>'n', 'ò'=>'o', 'ó'=>'o', 'ô'=>'o', 'õ'=>'o', 'ö'=>'o', 'ø'=>'o', 'ù'=>'u',
  'ú'=>'u', 'û'=>'u', 'ý'=>'y', 'ý'=>'y', 'þ'=>'b', 'ÿ'=>'y', 'ƒ'=>'f'
  }

p t.encode('us-ascii', :fallback => fallback)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks peter. I'm still having that error in the app where it doesn't accept any of these characters so I can't really test it. But I shall as soon as I can figure out what the problem is. –  kakubei Feb 12 '13 at 10:08
    
could be an encoding from one of your gems, can you run the codesnippet i provided by itself ? Also make sure to save the script itzself also in UTF-8 –  peter Feb 12 '13 at 10:45
    
peter, a million thanks, this did the trick and you were nice enough to take the time to write out all the needed characters. You went way above an beyond and I really appreciate it. Thanks! –  kakubei Feb 12 '13 at 11:49

In Ruby 1.9.3 you can use the :fallback option with encode:

"ŠšŽžÐ".encode('us-ascii', :fallback => { [your character table here] })
=> "SsZzDj"

It's also possible to do it with gsub as it accepts a conversion table as a hash argument in 1.9.x:

"ŠšŽžÐ".gsub(/[ŠšŽžÐ]/, [your character table here])
=> "SsZzDj"

Or better yet (by @steenslag):

character_table = [your table here]
regexp_keys     = Regexp.union(character_table.keys) 
"ŠšŽžÐ".gsub(regexp_keys, character_table)
=> "SsZzDj"

This sort of character conversion is called transliteration, which is good to know if you wish to google for more solutions (there are many Ruby libraries that support transliteration, but none of the ones I tested supported your character set completely).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Casper, I shall give it a try. A problem I have is that I can't test anything in the console with special characters, pasting your gsub example gives me this horrible thing: "\U+FFC5\U+FFA0\U+FFC5\U+FFA1\U+FFC5\U+FFBD\U+FFC5\U+FFBE\U+FFC3".gsub(/[\U+FFC‌​5\U+FFA0\U+FFC5\U+FFA1\U+FFC5\U+FFBD\U+FFC5\U+FFBE\U+FFC3]/, ['SsZzDj']). Adding it to the code, gives me the InvalidByteSequenceError: "\xC5" on US-ASCI error. I really don't know why. –  kakubei Feb 11 '13 at 12:26
    
@kakubei There are several reasons why that could be happening. Your terminal might not support UTF8, or your LANG shell environment might not be set up properly. You might want to post a question on superuser or a new stackoverflow question. However this might also fix it: run irb like so: irb -E UTF-8. –  Casper Feb 11 '13 at 12:31
1  
Note you can generate the Regular expression for the gsub example : re = Regexp.union(character_table.keys); "ŠšŽžÐ".gsub(re, character_table). –  steenslag Feb 11 '13 at 13:26
    
@steenslag - Nice. Added to answer also. Thank you. –  Casper Feb 11 '13 at 14:08
    
Still working on getting the console to accept special characters. Not even with irb -E UTF-8. Will post another question for it, thanks. –  kakubei Feb 12 '13 at 10:21

This works as I suppose you'd like it to have: translating characters in the array and leaving those not in there as they are:

# encoding: utf-8
lookup = {'Š'=>'S', 'š'=>'s', 'Ð'=>'Dj','Ž'=>'Z', 'ž'=>'z', 'À'=>'A', 'Á'=>'A', 'Â'=>'A', 'Ã'=>'A', 'Ä'=>'A',
        'Å'=>'A', 'Æ'=>'A', 'Ç'=>'C', 'È'=>'E', 'É'=>'E', 'Ê'=>'E', 'Ë'=>'E', 'Ì'=>'I', 'Í'=>'I', 'Î'=>'I',
        'Ï'=>'I', 'Ñ'=>'N', 'Ò'=>'O', 'Ó'=>'O', 'Ô'=>'O', 'Õ'=>'O', 'Ö'=>'O', 'Ø'=>'O', 'Ù'=>'U', 'Ú'=>'U',
        'Û'=>'U', 'Ü'=>'U', 'Ý'=>'Y', 'Þ'=>'B', 'ß'=>'Ss','à'=>'a', 'á'=>'a', 'â'=>'a', 'ã'=>'a', 'ä'=>'a',
        'å'=>'a', 'æ'=>'a', 'ç'=>'c', 'è'=>'e', 'é'=>'e', 'ê'=>'e', 'ë'=>'e', 'ì'=>'i', 'í'=>'i', 'î'=>'i',
        'ï'=>'i', 'ð'=>'o', 'ñ'=>'n', 'ò'=>'o', 'ó'=>'o', 'ô'=>'o', 'õ'=>'o', 'ö'=>'o', 'ø'=>'o', 'ù'=>'u',
        'ú'=>'u', 'û'=>'u', 'ý'=>'y', 'ý'=>'y', 'þ'=>'b', 'ÿ'=>'y', 'ƒ'=>'f'}

clean_genre = entry["genre"].chars.to_a.map { |x|
  if lookup.has_key?(x)
    lookup[x]
  else
    x
  end
}.join

for example this:

'aŠšŽž'.chars.to_a.map { |x|
  if lookup.has_key?(x)
    lookup[x]
  else
    x
  end
}.join

gives you 'aSsZz'.

Or move the block logic into the lookup table itself (thanks to steenslag for simplifying the default proc solution!):

lookup.default_proc = proc { |hash, key| key }

then the call would look as follows:

puts 'aŠšŽž'.chars.to_a.map { |x| lookup[x] }.join

Or even better (thanks again to steenslag for pointing out):

puts 'aŠšŽž'.gsub(/./) { |x| lookup[x] }
share|improve this answer
    
The default_proc of a Hash runs by definition when the key is not found; no need to check for that. lookup.default_proc = proc{|_, key| key} suffices. –  steenslag Feb 11 '13 at 16:34
    
In addition, with such a lookup table (with default_proc) you could do: puts 'aŠšŽž'.gsub(/./){ |x| lookup[x] }. –  steenslag Feb 11 '13 at 16:39
    
Nice! So many ways to do it in Ruby, will add to the answer. –  Tomasz Stanczak Feb 12 '13 at 7:27

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