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Can you bind to a local variable like this?

SystemDataBase.cs

namespace WebWalker
{
    public partial class SystemDataBase : Window
    {
        private string text = "testing";
...

SystemDataBase.xaml

 <TextBox 
       Name="stbSQLConnectionString" 
       Text="{SystemDataBase.text}">
 </TextBox>

??

Text is set to the local variable "text"

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5 Answers 5

The pattern is:

public string Text {get;set;}

and the binding is

{Binding Text, RelativeSource={RelativeSource FindAncestor, AncestorType=Window}}

If you want the binding to update automatically you should make it a DependencyProperty.


I think 3.5 added ElementName to bindings, so the following is a little easier:

<Window Name="Derp" ...
  <TextBlock Text="{Binding Text, ElementName=Derp}"/>
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2  
Or have the class implement INotifyPropertyChanged to have the binding work automatically. –  Lars Truijens Sep 27 '09 at 18:39
1  
I think you mean change it to a DependencyProperty. Implementing INPC on a DependencyObject would be foolish. –  Will Nov 27 '09 at 18:24
2  
+1 for derp! lol –  windowskm Jun 29 '12 at 14:23
    
Come to think of it, what is ElementName in this case? The name of the Window? –  windowskm Jun 29 '12 at 15:37
2  
@killianmcc: Its right in the code sample. <Window Name="Derp" Where Derp is a (at least how I normally do it) DependencyProperty defined on your window class (public partial class Herp : Window {}) –  Will Jun 29 '12 at 16:35

To bind to a local "variable" the variable should be:

  1. A property, not a field.
  2. Public.
  3. Either a notifying property (suitable for model classes) or a dependency property (sutable for view classes)

Examples:

public MyClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private void PropertyType myField;

    public PropertyType MyProperty
    {
        get
        {
            return this.myField;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value != this.myField)
            {
                this.myField = value;
                NotifyPropertyChanged("MyProperty");
            }
        }
    }

    protected void NotifyPropertyChanged(String propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
}

public MyClass : DependencyObject
{
    public PropertyType MyProperty
    {
        get
        {
            return (PropertyType)GetValue("MyProperty");
        }
        set
        {
            SetValue("MyProperty", value);
        }
    }

    // Look up DependencyProperty in MSDN for details
    public static DependencyProperty MyPropertyProperty = DependencyProperty.Register( ... );
}
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If you're doing a lot of this, you could consider binding the DataContext of the whole window to your class. This will be inherited by default, but can still be overridden as usual

<Window DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}">

Then for an individual components you can use

Text="{Binding Text}"
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I know this question is for WPF, but If your target is Silverlight then this the way to go.. Since Silverlight for Web and Phone does not have FindAncestor method for RelativeSource –  Adarsha Aug 7 '12 at 4:56

No it has to be a visible property.

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To bind a local variable which is present in your Window class it has to be : 1. Public property 2. A notifying property. For this your window class should implement INotifyPropertyChanged interface for this property.

Then in the constructor

public Assgn5()
{           
    InitializeComponent();

    this.DataContext = this; // or **stbSQLConnectionString**.DataContext = this;
}

 <TextBox 
   Name="stbSQLConnectionString" 
   Text="{Binding text}">
 </TextBox>
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