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Concerning the ReaderWriterLockSlim:

Acquiring two locks subsequently within the same thread should actually throw a LockRecursionException (the recursion policy is set to NoRecursion).

My observation results:

  • reader lock, then reader lock --> LockRecursionException
  • reader lock, then upgradeable reader lock --> LockRecursionException
  • reader lock, then writer lock --> LockRecursionException
  • upgradeable reader lock, then reader lock --> no exception
  • upgradeable reader lock, then upgradeable reader lock --> LockRecursionException
  • upgradeable reader lock, then writer lock --> no exception
  • writer lock, then reader lock --> LockRecursionException
  • writer lock, then upgradeable reader lock --> LockRecursionException
  • writer lock, then writer lock --> LockRecursionException

Is this behavior correct?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From the docs:

A thread in upgradeable mode can downgrade to read mode by first calling the EnterReadLock method and then calling the ExitUpgradeableReadLock method. This downgrade pattern is allowed for all lock recursion policies, even NoRecursion.

My understanding is that for the writing situation, entering a write lock is the normal way to move from upgradeable to write mode anyway, so has to be supported even under a policy of NoRecursion (there would seem to be little point to a non-upgradeable upgradeable lock :)

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1  
Yes, that would be my understanding as well. Those two paths are the normal upgrade and downgrade scenarios. Therefore they must be allowed regardless of the recursion policy. The confusion on my part stemmed at least in part from the fact that I never thought of it as a downgradeable lock as well.. –  John Sloper Feb 11 '13 at 12:23
    
@JohnSloper No, I hadn't realised it was downgradeable either. Handy though, if a thread can determine that it no longer needs to write. –  shambulator Feb 11 '13 at 12:25

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