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Hi I am using a vim setting to highlight columns past the column 80. This hardcoded setting is good enough for programming where I like to keep it in 79 columns. However for LaTeX, plain txt, RST, where I use different tw values it is not working for obvious reasons. Is it possible to somehow use the value of textwidth setting inside this regexp ? Or if not, how can I approach this problem ?

hi OverLength ctermbg=darkred ctermfg=white guibg=#592929
match OverLength /\%81v.\+/
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marked as duplicate by Thor, Ingo Karkat, Prince Goulash, glts, Chris Mar 3 at 7:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
yeah I think it is a dup –  Dārayavahuš tdi Feb 11 '13 at 13:12
    
Sounds like an XY problem to me. You can find some answers to the question you're asking in the body of your post here. –  glts Feb 11 '13 at 13:17
1  
See :h colorcolumn. –  romainl Feb 11 '13 at 13:27
    
You could also use ftplugin and set enable the higlihgting only for a certain set of files. –  Micha Wiedenmann Feb 11 '13 at 15:58
    
@romainl I know cc but I prefer this solution –  Dārayavahuš tdi Feb 12 '13 at 19:54

1 Answer 1

Instead of just setting the limit, why not have a function with a bind that'll highlight characters past n columns?

nnoremap <leader>h :call ToggleOverLengthHighlight()<CR>
let g:overlength_enabled = 0
highlight OverLength ctermbg=black guibg=#212121

function! ToggleOverLengthHighlight()
    if g:overlength_enabled == 0
        match OverLength /\%79v.*/
        let g:overlength_enabled = 1
        echo 'OverLength highlighting turned on'
    else
        match
        let g:overlength_enabled = 0
        echo 'OverLength highlighting turned off'
    endif
endfunction

enter image description here

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in our example, you also have 79 columns hardcoded –  Dārayavahuš tdi Apr 22 '13 at 9:01
    
@Dārayavahuštdi Eh, "hardcoded" isn't really the right term. Updated my answer. I still think this is a decent solution to this issue, as you won't have to tackle specific filetypes all the time. –  timss Apr 22 '13 at 9:48

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