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My string is "2345000012999922"

I want to convert it to: 2345 0000 12 9999 22. The pattern is always de same AAAA BBBB CC DDDD EE but EE is optional and may not be filled.

I tried:

string.format("{0:#### #### ## #### ##});

with no success. I used a long variable instead of string but still with no succed.

share|improve this question
    
    
Why won't you just add white spaces in the places you want? –  gdoron Feb 11 '13 at 13:12
    
@Arasa what about my method? –  vikas Feb 11 '13 at 13:33
    
I edited the post. THe last part of the string EE my not be present. –  anmarti Feb 11 '13 at 14:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
string s = "2345000012999922";
s = s.Insert(14, " ").Insert(10, " ").Insert(8, " ").Insert(4, " ");
Console.WriteLine(s);

Note: Inserting spaces from the end (i.e. indices go down) so that you can use the indices from the original string. If you tried it the other way, you'd have to successively add 1 to each index to account for the new spaces added before the place you are currently adding a space. Not critical, but I think it's easier to understand if the indices match the places to add spaces in the original string.

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Good strategy to adding spaces to a string - also works even it string is not a number. –  Grhm Feb 11 '13 at 13:17
    
This method would have been my choice except the OP states that the string will always evaluate to an integer in the pattern AAAA BBBB CC DDDD EE and I am concerned that 5 string allocations might be more expensive than parsing an integer, but like Grhm states, this would work better if the original string was not a number. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Feb 11 '13 at 13:26
    
Since the last 2 chars of the string may not exists I inserted the spaces from left to right by adding one to the index in the Insert method. –  anmarti Feb 11 '13 at 15:15

Try this:

void Main()
{
    var d = decimal.Parse("2345000012999922");

    Console.Out.WriteLine("{0:#### #### ## #### ##}", d);
}

First convert to decimal, then use your own strategy.

Formatting of numbers works right-to-left, meaning if you had 2 numbers as follows:

  • 2345000012999922
  • 23450000129999

And we did something like:

void Main()
{
    var d1 = decimal.Parse("23450000129999");
    var d2 = decimal.Parse("234500001299");

    Console.Out.WriteLine("{0:#### #### ## #### ##}", d1);
    Console.Out.WriteLine("{0:#### #### ## #### ##}", d2);
    Console.Out.WriteLine("{0:0000 0000 00 0000 00}", d1);
    Console.Out.WriteLine("{0:0000 0000 00 0000 00}", d2);
}

We'd get:

23 4500 00 1299 99
 2345 00 0012 99
0023 4500 00 1299 99
0000 2345 00 0012 99

(Notice the 0-padding).

In a format string, "0" means put the corresponding digit here, if present, otherwise pad with a 0. A "#" means, put the corresponding digit here, if present, otherwise ignore it.

With this in mind, I think your best strategy would be something like:

void Main()
{
    var s1 = "23450000129999";
    var s2 = "234500001299";
    var n1 = s1.Length;
    var n2 = s2.Length;
    var c = 12;
    var f1 = "{0:#### #### ## #### ##}";
    var f2 = "{0:#### #### ## ####}";
    var d1 = decimal.Parse(s1);
    var d2 = decimal.Parse(s2);

    Console.Out.WriteLine(n1 > c ? f1 : f2, d1);
    Console.Out.WriteLine(n2 > c ? f1 : f2, d2);
}

This will give:

23 4500 00 1299 99
23 4500 00 1299

The idea is that you check the string-length of the input string first. If it is 12, then you have the last optional bit absent, so you use the truncated format-string. If it is more than 12 (or equal to 14) then use the full format-string.

The other approaches such as regex and string manipulation are good approaches too, though I would suspect that they are less-performant. You should test all approaches though, especially if this piece of code will run many, many times (e.g., if you are showing data in a table).

You can improve the readability of the code further using extension methods by defining something like

public static class FormattingHelper
{
    public static string GetFormatString(this string s)
    {
        if (s.Length == 12)
            return "{0:#### #### ## ####}";
        else
            return "{0:#### #### ## #### ##}";
    }
}

void Main()
{
    var s1 = "23450000129999";
    var s2 = "234500001299";
    var d1 = decimal.Parse(s1);
    var d2 = decimal.Parse(s2);

    Console.Out.WriteLine(s1.GetFormatString(), d1);
    Console.Out.WriteLine(s2.GetFormatString(), d2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
A long rather than a decimal will also work in this case. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Feb 11 '13 at 13:22
    
What about if the last slice of the string EE is optional? –  anmarti Feb 11 '13 at 14:14
1  
Thanks for your effort but I think I will take the @Matthew's answers because its simplicity. –  anmarti Feb 11 '13 at 15:14

Works for me when using long (PowerShell test, should be the same for C#):

PS> '{0:#### #### ## #### ##}' -f 2345000012999922
2345 0000 12 9999 22
share|improve this answer

Just as another way of doing it (for all slightly daft):

string input = "2345000012999922";
string Formatted = new Regex(@"(\d{4})(\d{4})(\d{2})(\d{4})(\d{2})").
    replace(input, "$1 $2 $3 $4 $5");

//Formatted = 2345 0000 12 9999 22
share|improve this answer
    
This approach might work better for making the last bit optional, though in that case, I might use a pre-compiled RegEx to improve performance in case of tabulated data (where this would be called over and over). –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Feb 11 '13 at 14:54
string.Format("{0:#### #### ## #### ##}", 2345000012999922)

output

2345 0000 12 9999 22

Edited

This would also work for you

string str = "2345000012999922";

string str2 = string.Format("{0:#### #### ## #### ##}", Convert.ToDouble(str));
share|improve this answer
    
What about if the last slice of the string EE is optional? –  anmarti Feb 11 '13 at 14:14

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