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I'm trying to put Poisson continuous error bars on a histogram I'm making with matplotlib, but I can't seem to find a numpy function that will given me a 95% confidence interval assuming poissonian data. Ideally the solution doesn't depend on scipy, but anything will work. Does such a function exist? I've found a lot about bootstrapping but this seems a bit excessive in my case.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Using scipy.stats.poisson, and the interval method:

>>> scipy.stats.poisson.interval(0.95, [10, 20, 30])
(array([  4.,  12.,  20.]), array([ 17.,  29.,  41.]))

Even though it only makes limited sense to compute the Poisson distribution for non-integer values, the exact confidence intervals requested by the OP can be computed it can be done as follows:

>>> data = np.array([10, 20, 30])
>>> scipy.stats.poisson.interval(0.95, data)
(array([  4.,  12.,  20.]), array([ 17.,  29.,  41.]))
>>> np.array(scipy.stats.chi2.interval(.95, 2 * data)) / 2 - 1
array([[  3.7953887 ,  11.21651959,  19.24087402],
       [ 16.08480345,  28.67085357,  40.64883744]])

It's also possible to use the ppf method:

>>> data = np.array([10, 20, 30])
>>> scipy.stats.poisson.ppf([0.025, 0.975], data[:, None])
array([[  4.,  17.],
       [ 12.,  29.],
       [ 20.,  41.]])

But because the distribution is discrete the return values will be integers, and the confidence interval will not span 95% exactly:

>>> scipy.stats.poisson.ppf([0.025, 0.975], 10)
array([  4.,  17.])
>>> scipy.stats.poisson.cdf([4, 17], 10)
array([ 0.02925269,  0.98572239])
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do you know of a way to get exact return values? –  Shep Feb 12 '13 at 21:27
    
@Shep Just added a version of your method based on chi-squared, but using interval, to my answer. –  Jaime Feb 12 '13 at 21:46
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I ended up writing my own function based on some properties I found on Wikipedia.

def poisson_interval(k, alpha=0.05): 
    """
    uses chisquared info to get the poisson interval. Uses scipy.stats 
    (imports in function). 
    """
    from scipy.stats import chi2
    a = alpha
    low, high = (chi2.ppf(a/2, 2*k) / 2, chi2.ppf(1-a/2, 2*k + 2) / 2)
    if k == 0: 
        low = 0.0
    return low, high

This returns continuous (rather than discrete) bounds, which is more standard in my field.

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